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How Kyoto Is Rebuilding Itself As A Nanotech And Regenerative Medicine Powerhouse – Forbes

By daniellenierenberg

As humans continue to pump more and more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, concerns about global warming and climate change continue to grow. But what if that CO2 could be turned into a source of energy? One startup in Kyoto has developed cutting-edge nano-materials that could trap atmospheric CO2 and harness it as a power source. Its one way that Japans ancient capital is harnessing its large scientific and biomedical potential to address environmental and social problems.

Panning for invisible gold

Porous coordination polymers can be a form of carbon-capture technology, says discoverer Susumu Kitagawa, second from left, with (left to right) Atomis CTO Masakazu Higuchi, CEO Daisuke Asari, R&D officer Kenji Sumida, and COO Dai Kataoka.

Atomis is a new materials company that was spun off from Kyoto University. Founded in 2015 following government-supported research, its business is based on studies led by Susumu Kitagawa, a professor in the universitys Institute for Advanced Study. Its core technology is the production of materials comprising extremely small void spaces that can trap gases, including CO2. A breakthrough discovery in 1997 by Kitagawa, who has been considered a contender for the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, these porous coordination polymers (PCPs, aka metal-organic frameworks) have enormous potential as tools to precisely control gases.

Humans have used the principle behind PCPs for thousands of years. They work the same way that a hunk of charcoal traps ambient odor molecules in its large surface area, but PCPs are many times more powerful. To the naked eye, PCPs look like powders, pellets or granules of various colors, shapes and sizes. But if you were to zoom in, you would see that PCPs are sponge-like materials with pores the size of a nanometer, or one billionth of a meter. They can be designed as scaffoldlike 3D structures from metals and organic ligands, and can be used for storage, separation and conversion of molecules.

These materials are unique in that we can design the shapes and chemical properties of the pores to suit specific applications, and some of the materials have flexible structures, which can potentially provide them with even more advanced features, says Daisuke Asari, president and CEO of Atomis. The company is basically the only business in Japan working with these materials in an industrial context. Collaborating with Kitagawa is a big advantage over foreign rivals, adds Kenji Sumida, executive officer for R&D.

One challenge related to these nanomaterials is that its difficult and costly to produce more than a few kilograms per day. Massively scaling production so that PCPs can be used to fight climate change is one reason that Atomis was founded, says Atomis founder and CTO Masakazu Higuchi, one of Kitagawas collaborators. The firm is developing solid-state techniques and making capital investments to increase PCP production capacity. Meanwhile, Atomis has developed products that harness the groundbreaking potential of PCPs, including Cubitan, a compact and lightweight gas cylinder for industrial and consumer use packed with smart features, such as the ability to notify users when the amount of reserve gas becomes low.

When viewed without special equipment, PCPs look like powders, pellets or granules of various colors, shapes and sizes, but they are sponge-like materials with countless pores the size of a nanometer.

Kitagawa has his sights on the bigger picture. He believes PCPs can be used as a form of carbon-capture technology, allowing the synthesis of methanol, an energy source. Thats why he calls CO2 invisible gold.

In ancient China, Taoist mystics were said to live in the mountains and survive simply on mist, which consists of water, oxygen and CO2, says Kitagawa. They were taking something valueless and using it for energy. Similarly, PCPs can control gases that humans cannot use and turn them into something beneficial, for instance absorbing CO2 in the air and turning into methanol and other hydrocarbon materials.

Building a regenerative medicine Silicon Valley

Atomis is one of many science startups in Kyoto that have benefitted from collaborative research between industry and government. Its part of a growing startup industry in Japan, where total funding for new companies reached a record high of 388 billion yen in 2018, up from 64.5 billion yen in 2012, according to Japan Venture Research. One driver for this expansion is science and technology discoveries.

While it may be known for its traditional culture, Kyoto has a strong pedigree in scientific research. It is home to 38 universities and about 150,000 students, which form a large pool of institutional knowledge, experience and talent. Many recent Nobel laureates either graduated from or taught at Kyoto University, including professors Tasuku Honjo and Shinya Yamanaka, who won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 2018 and 2012, respectively. Working on discoveries by Yamanaka, Megakaryon has become a world leader in creating artificial blood platelets made from synthetic stem cells.Theres also a large group of high-tech companies that have carved out niches for themselves internationally.

Kyoto is a unique city in that it has an independent spirit that is similar to the U.S. West Coast, says Eiichi Yamaguchi, a professor at Kyoto University who has founded four companies.

Kyoto companies like Murata Manufacturing, Horiba, Shimadzu, and Kyocera have a global market and theyre competing with China, says Eiichi Yamaguchi, a professor at Kyoto University who has founded four companies. Thats the difference with companies in Tokyo, which are more domestically oriented.

Yamaguchi has authored several books on innovation, and says there is a growing awareness of the importance of collaborative research and entrepreneurship in Kyoto. He cites a recently formed cooperative group of seven university chairpersons and presidents from leading materials and biosciences companies that meets to discuss issues such as fostering new technologies, for instance building high-speed hydrogen fueling systems.

Kyoto is a unique city in that it has an independent spirit that is similar to the U.S. West Coast, says Yamaguchi. Kyoto is only a fraction of the size of Tokyo, but if you take a stand here, people will pay attention.

Another group that is promoting local high-tech business is Innovation Hub Kyoto. Its an open innovation facility based in the Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine aimed at commercializing research from the university. Steps away from Kyotos historic Kamo River, its geared to researchers, investors, startups, and established companies working in the field of medical innovation including device development and drug discovery. This is where Japanese researchers are trying to build a Silicon Valley of regenerative medicine.

Tenants at Innovation Hub Kyoto can use this wet lab for research.

Part of the Kyoto University Medical Science and Business Liaison Organization, the hub was established about 15 years ago and opened a new building in 2017 with the support of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The structure has a variety of labs, including ones meeting biosafety level P2 and for animal experiments.

Its tough for startups in Japan to access to animal laboratories like the one we have, says hub leader Yutaka Teranishi, a professor in the Graduate School of Medicine who estimates that some 50% of university researchers want to work with industry, up from 10% a few years ago. Were focused on university startups because its very difficult for them to develop drugs from just an alliance between companies and universities.

About 28 companies are tenants at Innovation Hub Kyoto. They include major brands such as Shimadzu and Nippon Boehringer Ingelheim as well as younger businesses. One is AFI, founded in 2013 and focused on fluid, electric filtering and sorting (FES) technology that can be used for applications ranging from food safety inspections to rapid diagnosis of disease to regenerative medicine.

Tomoko Bylund heads the Japan office of CELLINK, a Swedish bioprinting and bioink company that is a tenant at Innovation Hub Kyoto.

Another tenant is CELLINK, a Swedish bioprinting and bioink company headed in the Japan by Tomoko Bylund. Using its products, researchers can print body parts with human cells for drug and cosmetics testing. In 2019, the first 3D print of a human cornea in the U.S. was accomplished with the companys BIO X Bioprinter.

iHeart Japan is also a tenant. It was established in 2013 as a regenerative medicine business and is aiming to address a major shortage in the Japanese medical system: only about 40 out of 200,000 people on national waiting lists can receive donor hearts every year. The company is developing innovative medical products such as multi-layered cardiac cell sheets derived from synthetic stem cells. The Hub basis its success in fostering companies on its diversity and the business environment in Kyoto.

We have people from different backgrounds here who are exchanging cultures and experimental results, and this diversity is powering innovation here, says Teranishi. There are many traditional industries in Kyoto, and though people say its a conservative city, these companies have survived because theyre open to new technologies and have taken the time to choose which ones can help them. Thats how this city and its businesses have lasted for more than 1,000 years.

Diversity is powering innovation here, says Yutaka Teranishi, center, head of Innovation Hub Kyoto, with Kyoto University professor Hirokazu Yamamoto, left, and Graduate School of Medicine lecturer Taro Yamaguchi, right.

To learn more about Atomis, click here.

To learn more about Innovation Hub Kyoto, click here.

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D’OXYVA improves dermal microcirculation and promotes wound healing in the diabetic foot – PR Web

By daniellenierenberg

LOS ANGELES (PRWEB) January 09, 2020

DOXYVA is a validated circulatory and nerve stimulant. The system was used by Prof. Puruhito for CO transdermal delivery, which has been shown to produce higher oxygen unloading by hemoglobin, thereby increasing oxygen-rich blood flow in the local microcirculatory system. This improved dermal microcirculation leads, in turn, to enhanced wound healing.

The American Diabetes Association standards of care for DFUs refer to microvascular complications and their treatment via improvements in microcirculation; therefore, Prof. Puruhitos team set out to test CO transdermal delivery via DOXYVA in their patients. They have been gathering data since 2015, which led to the following results.

During the course of a 5-day treatment, O saturation increased in patients treated with transdermal CO in comparison to controls (15 patients/group) over the whole measurement range (up to 120 minutes post application). Moreover, a consistent heart rate decrease was found in patients undergoing transdermal CO treatment. Furthermore, the perfusion index (PI) showed an upwards tendency in the treatment group, whereas it remained stable for untreated controls. See figure 1.

Figure 1: Changes observed after a 5-day transdermal CO treatment with DOXYVA. H1-H5: pre-treatment, 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after; blue trace: control, orange trace: treatment. (A) Changes in O saturation (B) Decrease in heart rate due to treatment (C) Masimo measurements of PI.

In light of these results, Prof. Puruhitos team performed extra measurements of transcutaneous carbon dioxide (TcPCO), O saturation, and PI in the 15 patients treated with DOXYVA for transdermal CO delivery. This data show that the oxygen saturation reached almost 100% in some patients, whereas the TcPCO remained relatively stable throughout the treatment time (120 minutes). For more detailed information, see figure 2.

Figure 2: Transcutaneous CO pressure (TcPCO), O saturation, and PI assessment in the 15 patients subjected to transdermal CO. (A) SENTEC TcPCO measurements for all patients at various time points after DOXYVA application (pre-treatment, 5, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after) (B) O saturation (C) PI.

Finally, Prof. Puruhitos team demonstrated the positive effects of transdermal CO delivery via DOXYVA on the healing of DFUs (fig. 3), proving the clinical potential of this intervention to improve the quality of life of people suffering from this common complication of diabetes.

In conclusion, the use of a DOXYVA device for transdermal CO delivery improves the outcomes of DFUs by enhancing dermal microcirculation and increasing perfusion rates and tissue oxygenation, therefore assisting in the healing process of the ulcers typical of diabetes neuropathy.

About DOXYVADOXYVA (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) is a novel, clinically validated blood flow and nerve stimulant for people suffering from neuropathy. In various clinical trials, DOXYVA has validated leading independent research results and demonstrated above-average results in improving a host of physiological functions.

Subjects suffering from high blood sugar have reported neuropathy pain relief minutes after DOXYVA was administered and long-term blood sugar level improvements after just a few weeks.

Rapid and gentle skin delivery (over-the-skin) with the DOXYVA lightweight, handheld device has prompted improvements in blood microcirculation or PI by 33%* on average in all participants. Lasting results have been measured at 5-60 minutes and up to 4 hours after a single 5-minute DOXYVA delivery on the skin surface without reduction in PI levels.

About Prof. PuruhitoIto Puruhito, MD is professor in the Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery at Dr. Soetomo General Hospital as well as a senior lecturer in the Faculty of Medicine at Universitas Airlangga (Indonesia). From 2001 to 2016, he was the rector of the aforementioned university. Prof. Puruhito finished his medicine studies at Universitas Airlangga in 1967, and in 1972 he received a doctorate degree, graduating cum laude from Frederich-Alexander University (Erlangen-Nrnberg, Germany). In his native country, he developed the Department of Thoracic-Cardiovascular Surgery at his former university, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya. In 1978, he co-founded the Indonesian Association of Thoracic, Cardiac and Vascular Surgery. Prof. Puruhito has authored numerous indexed research articles in Scopus, ISI-Thompson or PUBMED, and scientific presentations and written several books in Indonesian, English, and German. He acted as reviewer for peer-reviewed journals such as Medical Tribune, Annals of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Asian Annals of Surgery, Medicinus, and many more Indonesian medical-surgical journals. Currently, apart from lecturing, Prof. Puruhito actively researches stem cells, cardiovascular medicine, and surgery at the Institute of Tropical Disease as well as some work in microcirculation. Further, he acts as coordinator of research affairs at the Department of TCV-Surgery at Dr. Soetomo General Hospital Surabaya. Since 2014, he has been the chairman of the Council of Research in the Ministry of Research Technology and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia.

About Circularity Healthcare, LLCCircularity Healthcare, LLC, located in Los Angeles, CA, is a private biotech and medtech products and services company that designs, makes, markets, sells, distributes, and licenses its patented and patent-pending technologies, such as its flagship non-invasive deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator product line, DOXYVA. One of the main mechanisms underlying DOXYVAs science received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2019. Circularity enters into exclusive agreements with manufacturers to launch products in large and small clinics and hospitals to help enhance their profits and credit profiles with a wide variety of advanced products and services. In addition, Circularity Healthcare assists in the financing of equipment, working capital, and patient financing at industry-leading terms and speed.

For more information, please visit http://www.circularityhealthcare.com or http://doxyva.com; doctors (Rx only) visit http://wound.doxyva.com and send your general inquiries via the Contact Us page. For specific inquiries, contact Circularity Customer Care at info(at)doxyva(dot)com, info(at)circularityhealthcare(dot)com, or by phone (toll free) at 1-855-5DOXYVA or 1-626-240-0956.

References:

1.Rogers, L. C., Muller-Delp, J. M. & Mudde, T. A. Transdermal delivery of carbon dioxide boosts microcirculation in subjects with and without diabetes, Information summary for healthcare professionals. Circularity Healthcare, LLC2.Puruhito, I. et al. DOXYVA Medical Device, a Potentially Cost-Efficient and Safe Adjuvant Therapy for Diabetic Ulcers: A Pilot Study. J Vasc Surg (2019).3.Puruhito, I., Soebroto, H., Sembiring, Y. & Nur Rahmi, C. Observation of O2 Saturation after transdermal CO2 delivery using Doxyva apparatus.4.Jayarasti, K. & Puruhito, I. Preliminary study of measurement of TcPCO2 using SENTEC device.5.Nur Rahmi, C. Pengaruh Pemberian Transdermal CO2 terhadap Output Perawatan Luka Kaki Diabetik Wagner I dan II. (2018).6.D`OXYVA Relief from neuropathic pain. D`OXYVA https://doxyva.com/complete-fast-advanced-painless-relief-from-neuropathic-pain/.

Forward-Looking InformationThis press release may contain forward-looking information. This includes, or may be based upon, estimates, forecasts and statements as to managements expectations with respect to, among other things, the quality of the products of Circularity Healthcare, LLC, its resources, progress in development, demand, and market outlook for non-invasive transdermal delivery medical devices. Forward-looking information is based on the opinions and estimates of management at the date the information is given and is subject to a variety of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from those initially projected. These factors include the inherent risks involved in the launch of a new medical device, innovation and market acceptance uncertainties, fluctuating components and other advanced material prices, new federal or state governmental regulations, the possibility of project cost overruns or unanticipated costs and expenses, uncertainties relating to the availability and costs of financing needed in the future and other factors. The forward-looking information contained herein is given as of the date hereof and Circularity Healthcare, LLC assumes no responsibility to update or revise such information to reflect new events or circumstances, except as required by law. Circularity Healthcare, LLC makes no representations or warranties as to the accuracy or completeness of this press release and shall have no liability for any representations (expressed or implied) for any statement made herein, or for any omission from this press release.

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How a controversial condition called PANDAS is gaining ground on autism – Spectrum

By daniellenierenberg

PANDAS emerged in the late 1980s in the wake of a resurgence of rheumatic fever in Pennsylvania, Utah and Missouri. Rheumatic fever is an immune response to group A streptococcus, the bacterial strain that causes strep throat and scarlet fever. It arises when those infections are not treated properly, usually in children. In the worst cases, it can lead to heart failure or permanent heart damage. Some people need to take antibiotics for a decade or more.

Up to 30 percent of children with rheumatic fever develop distinctive motor and behavioral traits called Sydenham chorea or, less commonly these days, Saint Vitus dance, after the patron saint of neurological conditions. Children with this condition exhibit jerky, involuntary movements of their hands, feet and face. By some accounts, they also become irritable and prone to emotional outbursts, have trouble concentrating and temporarily lose their ability to read and write. A frequent complaint heard from the mother is that the character of her child is completely changed, wrote Canadian physician William Osler, who first characterized Sydenham chorea in 1894.

During the rheumatic fever outbreak, Swedo sent questionnaires to 37 parents, asking them about their childrens behaviors. She says she hoped to find a brain-based explanation for OCD, which had, until then, largely been credited to harsh parenting techniques. The findings confirmed her suspicions: Children with Sydenham chorea had significantly more obsessive thoughts or behaviors than children with rheumatic fever alone. Based on follow-up interviews, Swedo determined that three children diagnosed with Sydenham chorea met the diagnostic criteria for OCD.

Swedo then inverted her approach. Rather than seeking out children with rheumatic fever, she began studying children with OCD and Tourette syndrome, and swabbing their throats for evidence of a strep infection. She often found it which is not surprising because it is a common infection, and many children also carry the bacteria without getting sick. What was surprising, Swedo says, was what happened when she started treating those children.

She recalls one child who refused to swallow his spit, preferring, instead, to stockpile it. He had three cups under his bed, she says. When she treated him with penicillin, she says, he responded beautifully; his obsessive-compulsive symptoms disappeared. He then had another strep infection, and the OCD-like behavior came roaring back. In another child, she tried plasmapheresis, a technique to separate the childs blood cells from the plasma and strip out the germ-fighting antibodies circulating in his system. She says that led to an 80 percent decrease in the boys OCD traits, according to his parents.

Based on those observations and more over the next decade, Swedo came to believe that an immune response to infection can trigger an improperly diagnosed class of psychiatric conditions. She would go on to investigate and rule out other connections between infection and conditions of brain development, including the spurious association between Lyme infection and autism. In 2006, she proposed a trial to test chelation therapy, which some parents of autistic children pursue based on the bogus belief that mercury and other heavy metals in vaccines cause the condition. Critics called the trial unethical and a waste of funding, and it was ultimately abandoned due to safety concerns.

Theres going to be diagnostic confusion whether a child has a late presentation of autism or if they have PANDAS. Susan Swedo

It was PANDAS that would become Swedos legacy. In 1998, Swedo proposed five criteria to diagnose PANDAS: the presence of OCD or a tic disorder, sudden onset prior to puberty, a waxing and waning pattern of trait severity, an association between strep infections and behavioral traits, and neurological abnormalities such as jerking movements or problems with coordination. Despite the clear, testable criteria she laid out, the definition of PANDAS proved elastic in the hands of practitioners. By 2008, one study had found that only 39 percent of children diagnosed with PANDAS actually fit Swedos original definition. So many children were diagnosed, in fact, that Stanford Universitys multidisciplinary PANDAS clinic the first of its kind when it opened in 2012 sees children from within only a seven-county area and only if they agree to participate in research.

Given the surge of interest, the NIH launched a $3 million multicenter study the largest and most rigorous analysis of the condition. The researchers followed 71 children who met PANDAS diagnostic criteria over two years and compared them with children who had traits of Tourette syndrome or OCD but not PANDAS. Two landmark studies, published in 2008 and 2011, found that in 91 percent of all PANDAS cases, there was no association between the timing of strep infections or presence of strep antibodies and flare-ups of OCD or tics. Even though children with PANDAS were more likely to receive antibiotics than the other children were, the researchers could detect no difference in the number of flare-ups the children experienced.

The NIH makes no mention of these studies on its information pages about PANDAS, which Swedo helped draft. To be fair, the results left just enough room for doubts to creep in. Many strep infections go unnoticed and can trigger immune reactions that standard tests do not detect. The researchers consulted Swedo before the trial, but she says they approached it with an agenda to disprove PANDAS. For example, she says, most of the PANDAS children in the study had Tourette syndrome over a long period of time and showed no signs of abrupt-onset OCD, PANDAS hallmark behavioral trait. However, Kaplan, an investigator on those trials, says all of the participants fit Swedos published definition.

Swedo and her colleagues later proposed a new, broader condition that would better fit the state of the evidence: pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome, or PANS. This umbrella diagnosis is not restricted to children with strep or any other type of infection. It might even be caused, for instance, by environmental factors or metabolic disorders. Nor is it limited to young children: PANS can strike anyone up to the age of 18. The main requirement for PANS is the acute onset of OCD or restricted food intake, though the working guidelines make it clear that mild, non-impairing obsessions or compulsions do not rule out the syndrome.

One 2015 study in mice revealed how strep infections could cause brain inflammation, but no studies have followed a large group of children to try to link infections and PANDAS since the NIH-funded studies. Asked why no one has attempted a new study, Swedo says the field has moved on, adding, You cant fight a felonious report with additional data.

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MicroCures Awarded $1.5M SBIR Grant To Support Development of Novel Therapeutic Platform for Accelerated Tissue Repair – BioSpace

By daniellenierenberg

Funding to Support Ongoing Advancement of siFi2, Lead Candidate from Companys First-of-its-Kind Platform for Precisely Controlling Core Cell Migration Mechanisms

New York, NY, January 7, 2020 MicroCures, a biopharmaceutical company developing novel therapeutics that harness the bodys innate regenerative mechanisms to accelerate tissue repair, today announced that it has been awarded a Phase 2 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The two-year, $1.5 million award will support ongoing development of the companys lead product candidate, siFi2. siFi2, a small interfering RNA (siRNA) therapeutic that can be applied topically, is designed to enhance recovery after trauma. This Phase 2 grant continues the companys successful Phase 1 SBIR contract which demonstrated significantly improved repair of burn wounds following treatment with siFi2 in animal models.

MicroCures technology is based on foundational scientific research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine regarding the fundamental role that cell movement plays as a driver of the bodys innate capacity to repair tissue, nerves, and organs. The company has shown that complex and dynamic networks of microtubules within cells crucially control cell migration, and that this cell movement can be reliably modulated to achieve a range of therapeutic benefits. Based on these findings, the company has established a first-of-its-kind proprietary platform to create siRNA-based therapeutics capable of precisely controlling the speed and direction of cell movement by selectively silencing microtubule regulatory proteins (MRPs).

The company has developed a broad pipeline of therapeutic programs with an initial focus in the area of tissue, nerve and organ repair. Unlike regenerative medicine approaches that rely upon engineered materials or systemic growth factor/stem cell therapeutics, MicroCures technology directs and enhances the bodys inherent healing processes through local, temporary modulation of cell motility. The companys lead drug candidate, siFi2, is a topical siRNA-based treatment designed to silence the activity of Fidgetin-Like 2 (FL2), a fundamental MRP, within an area of wounded tissue. In doing so, the therapy temporarily triggers accelerated movement of cells essential for repair into an injury area. Importantly, based on its topical administration, siFi2 can be applied early in the treatment process as a supplement to current standard of care.

We are grateful for NIHs continued support of our work through this multi-year Phase 2 SBIR grant. This non-dilutive financial support allows us to continue building a robust portfolio of preclinical data in animal models that demonstrate the therapeutic potential of siFi2 to significantly improve and accelerate healing of burn wounds, said David Sharp, Ph.D., co-founder and chief science officer of MicroCures. This funding will help advance our research as we work towards first-in-human clinical trial in 2020.

The initial Phase 1 SBIR grant from NIH funded preclinical research by MicroCures which demonstrated that treatment with siFi2 accelerated re-epithelization, improved collagen deposit and maturation, and improved quality of healing in a porcine full thickness burn model. Specific findings showed that following eight weeks of treatment, 39% of siFi2-treated wounds were closed as compared to only 11% for control subjects and 0% for placebo. Additionally, siFi2-treated subjects demonstrated a significantly improved rate of healing as measured by epithelial surface measurements as compared to placebo (p = 0.0106) and control (p = 0.0012).

About MicroCures

MicroCures develops biopharmaceuticals that harness innate cellular mechanisms within the body to accelerate and improve recovery after traumatic injury. MicroCures has developed a first-of-its-kind therapeutic platform that precisely controls the rate and direction of cell migration, offering the potential to deliver powerful therapeutic benefits for a variety of large and underserved medical applications.

MicroCures has developed a broad pipeline of novel therapeutic programs with an initial focus in the area of tissue, nerve and organ repair. The companys lead therapeutic candidate, siFi2, targets excisional wound healing, a multi-billion dollar market inadequately served by current treatments. Additional applications for the companys cell migration accelerator technology include dermal burn repair, corneal burn repair, cavernous nerve regeneration, spinal cord regeneration, and cardiac tissue repair. Cell migration decelerator applications include combatting cancer metastases and fibrosis. The company protects its unique platform and proprietary therapeutic programs with a robust intellectual property portfolio including eight issued or allowed patents, as well as eight pending patent applications.

For more information please visit: http://www.microcures.com

Disclaimer: The SBIR Grant (2R44AR070696-02A1) is supported by the NIHs National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. The content of this press release is solely the responsibility of MicroCures and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

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MicroCures Awarded $1.5M SBIR Grant To Support Development of Novel Therapeutic Platform for Accelerated Tissue Repair - BioSpace

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MicroCures Awarded $1.5M SBIR Grant To Support Development of Novel Therapeutic Platform for Accelerated Tissue Repair – Yahoo Finance

By daniellenierenberg

Funding to Support Ongoing Advancement of siFi2, Lead Candidate from Companys First-of-its-Kind Platform for Precisely Controlling Core Cell Migration Mechanisms

NEW YORK, Jan. 07, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- MicroCures, a biopharmaceutical company developing novel therapeutics that harness the bodys innate regenerative mechanisms to accelerate tissue repair, today announced that it has been awarded a Phase 2 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The two-year, $1.5 million award will support ongoing development of the companys lead product candidate, siFi2. siFi2, a small interfering RNA (siRNA) therapeutic that can be applied topically, is designed to enhance recovery after trauma. This Phase 2 grant continues the companys successful Phase 1 SBIR contract which demonstrated significantly improved repair of burn wounds following treatment with siFi2 in animal models.

MicroCures technology is based on foundational scientific research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine regarding the fundamental role that cell movement plays as a driver of the bodys innate capacity to repair tissue, nerves, and organs. The company has shown that complex and dynamic networks of microtubules within cells crucially control cell migration, and that this cell movement can be reliably modulated to achieve a range of therapeutic benefits. Based on these findings, the company has established a first-of-its-kind proprietary platform to create siRNA-based therapeutics capable of precisely controlling the speed and direction of cell movement by selectively silencing microtubule regulatory proteins (MRPs).

The company has developed a broad pipeline of therapeutic programs with an initial focus in the area of tissue, nerve and organ repair. Unlike regenerative medicine approaches that rely upon engineered materials or systemic growth factor/stem cell therapeutics, MicroCures technology directs and enhances the bodys inherent healing processes through local, temporary modulation of cell motility. The companys lead drug candidate, siFi2, is a topical siRNA-based treatment designed to silence the activity of Fidgetin-Like 2 (FL2), a fundamental MRP, within an area of wounded tissue. In doing so, the therapy temporarily triggers accelerated movement of cells essential for repair into an injury area. Importantly, based on its topical administration, siFi2 can be applied early in the treatment process as a supplement to current standard of care.

We are grateful for NIHs continued support of our work through this multi-year Phase 2 SBIR grant. This non-dilutive financial support allows us to continue building a robust portfolio of preclinical data in animal models that demonstrate the therapeutic potential of siFi2 to significantly improve and accelerate healing of burn wounds, said David Sharp, Ph.D., co-founder and chief science officer of MicroCures. This funding will help advance our research as we work towards first-in-human clinical trial in 2020.

The initial Phase 1 SBIR grant from NIH funded preclinical research by MicroCures which demonstrated that treatment with siFi2 accelerated re-epithelization, improved collagen deposit and maturation, and improved quality of healing in a porcine full thickness burn model. Specific findings showed that following eight weeks of treatment, 39% of siFi2-treated wounds were closed as compared to only 11% for control subjects and 0% for placebo. Additionally, siFi2-treated subjects demonstrated a significantly improved rate of healing as measured by epithelial surface measurements as compared to placebo (p = 0.0106) and control (p = 0.0012).

About MicroCures

MicroCures develops biopharmaceuticals that harness innate cellular mechanisms within the body to accelerate and improve recovery after traumatic injury. MicroCures has developed a first-of-its-kind therapeutic platform that precisely controls the rate and direction of cell migration, offering the potential to deliver powerful therapeutic benefits for a variety of large and underserved medical applications.

MicroCures has developed a broad pipeline of novel therapeutic programs with an initial focus in the area of tissue, nerve and organ repair. The companys lead therapeutic candidate, siFi2, targets excisional wound healing, a multi-billion dollar market inadequately served by current treatments. Additional applications for the companys cell migration accelerator technology include dermal burn repair, corneal burn repair, cavernous nerve regeneration, spinal cord regeneration, and cardiac tissue repair. Cell migration decelerator applications include combatting cancer metastases and fibrosis. The company protects its unique platform and proprietary therapeutic programs with a robust intellectual property portfolio including eight issued or allowed patents, as well as eight pending patent applications.

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For more information please visit: http://www.microcures.com

Disclaimer: The SBIR Grant (2R44AR070696-02A1) is supported by the NIHs National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. The content of this press release is solely the responsibility of MicroCures and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Contact:

Vida Strategic Partners (On behalf of MicroCures)

Stephanie Diaz (investors)415-675-7401sdiaz@vidasp.com

Tim Brons (media)415-675-7402tbrons@vidasp.com

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MicroCures Awarded $1.5M SBIR Grant To Support Development of Novel Therapeutic Platform for Accelerated Tissue Repair - Yahoo Finance

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Duke researchers land $6M in federal grants to advance gene editing – WRAL Tech Wire

By daniellenierenberg

DURHAM Hemophilia. Cystic fibrosis. Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Huntingtons disease. These are just a few of the thousands of disorders caused by mutations in the bodys DNA. Treating the root causes of these debilitating diseases has become possible only recently, thanks to the development of genome editing tools such as CRISPR, which can change DNA sequences in cells and tissues to correct fundamental errors at the source but significant hurdles must be overcome before genome-editing treatments are ready for use in humans.

Enter the National Institutes of Health Common FundsSomatic Cell Genome Editing (SCGE)program, established in 2018 to help researchers develop and assess accurate, safe and effective genome editing therapies for use in the cells and tissues of the body (aka somatic cells) that are affected by each of these diseases.

Todaywith three ongoing grants totaling more than $6 million in research fundingDuke University is tied with Yale University, UC Berkeley and UC Davis for the most projects supported by the NIH SCGE Program.

In the 2019 SCGE awards cycle, Charles Gersbach, the Rooney Family Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and collaborators across Duke and North Carolina State University received two grants: the first will allow them to study how CRISPR genome editing affects engineered human muscle tissues, while the second project will develop new CRISPR tools to turn genes on and off rather than permanently alter the targeted DNA sequence. This work builds on a 2018 SCGE grant, led by Aravind Asokan, professor and director of gene therapy in the Department of Surgery, which focuses on using adeno-associated viruses to deliver gene editing tools to neuromuscular tissue.

Duke engineers improve CRISPR genome editing with biomedical tails

There is an amazing team of engineers, scientists and clinicians at Duke and the broader Research Triangle coalescing around the challenges of studying and manipulating the human genome to treat diseasefrom delivery to modeling to building new tools, said Gersbach, who with his colleagues recently launched the Duke Center for Advanced Genomic Technologies (CAGT), a collaboration of the Pratt School of Engineering, Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, and School of Medicine. Were very excited to be at the center of those efforts and greatly appreciate the support of the NIH SCGE Program to realize this vision.

For their first grant, Gersbach will collaborate with fellow Duke biomedical engineering faculty Nenad Bursac and George Truskey to monitor how genome editing affects engineered human muscle tissue. Through their new project, the team will use human pluripotent stem cells to make human muscle tissues in the lab, specifically skeletal and cardiac muscle, which are often affected by genetic diseases. These systems will then serve as a more accurate model for monitoring the health of human tissues, on-target and off-target genome modifications, tissue regeneration, and possible immune responses during CRISPR-mediated genome editing.

Duke researchers: Single CRISPR treatment provides long-term benefits in mice

Currently, most genetic testing occurs using animal models, but those dont always accurately replicate the human response to therapy, says Truskey, the Goodson Professor of Biomedical Engineering.

Bursac adds, We have a long history of engineering human cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues with the right cell types and physiology to model the response to gene editing systems like CRISPR. With these platforms, we hope to help predict how muscle will respond in a human trial.

Gersbach will work with Tim Reddy, a Duke associate professor of biostatistics and bioinformatics, and Rodolphe Barrangou, the Todd R. Klaenhammer Distinguished Professor in Probiotics Research at North Carolina State University, on the second grant. According to Gersbach, this has the potential to extend the impact of genome editing technologies to a greater diversity of diseases, as many common diseases, such as neurodegenerative and autoimmune conditions, result from too much or too little of certain genes rather than a single genetic mutation. This work builds on previous collaborations between Gersbach, Barrangou and Reddy developing bothnew CRISPR systems for gene regulationandto regulate the epigenome rather than permanently delete DNA sequences.

Aravind Asokan leads Dukes initial SCGE grant, which explores the the evolution of next generation of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), which have emerged as a safe and effective system to deliver gene therapies to targeted cells, especially those involved in neuromuscular diseases like spinal muscular atrophy, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other myopathies. However, delivery of genome editing tools to the stem cells of neuromuscular tissue is particularly challenging. This collaboration between Asokan and Gersbach builds on their previous work in usingAAV and CRISPR to treat animal models of DMD.

We aim to correct mutations not just in the mature muscle cells, but also in the muscle stem cells that regenerate skeletal muscle tissue, explainsAsokan. This approach is critical to ensuring long-term stability of genome editing in muscle and ultimately we hope to establish a paradigm where our cross-cutting viral evolution approach can enable efficient editing in multiple organ systems.

Click through to learn more about theDuke Center for Advanced Genomic Technologies.

(C) Duke University

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Cardio Round-up: Look Back at 2019, The Importance of Sleep, and More – DocWire News

By daniellenierenberg

This weeks Cardio Round-up features a look back at what you may have missed during the holidays, as well as some of the big 2019 cardiology stories.

The past year saw some big stories like the Apple Heart study, presented at ACC.19, which essentially validated the ability of a wearable device (an Apple iWatch) equipped with a tachogram-tracking algorithm was able to detect pulse irregularities associated with atrial fibrillation. Icosapent ethyl also featured prominently, gaining an FDA approval for the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk as an add-on to statin therapy in high-risk patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Dapagliflozin (highlighted in the DAPA-HF study) also was shown to be an effective treatment for heart failure in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

2019 In Cardiology: Apple Heart Study Lands; Icosapent Ethyl Gets FDA Nod for New Indication; Dapagliflozin For Nondiabetics; and More

A new observational study published inEuropacesuggests it is possible to monitor and predict individual progression ofatrial fibrillation (AFib) using pacemakers or defibrillators.We aimed to study the progression of AER in individual patients with implantable devices and AFib episodes, the paper authors wrote. The study results indicated that the slope of AAR changes during the progression of AFib showed patient-specific patterns correlating with the time-to-completion of AER (R2 = 0.85). This technology opens up enormous possibilities in personalized medicine for AFib patients because it allows us to determine the progression rate of the arrhythmia in each individual and to optimize the timing of medical intervention with current treatment options, one of the researchers said in a press release.

Personalized Medicine for AFib: How Electric Activity in the Heart Can Predict Individual Progression of Atrial Fibrillation

A research team, publishing the study in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, worked on converting adipogenic mesenchymal stem cells, which reside within fat cells, into cardiac progenitor cells. The ensuing cardiac progenitor cells can be programmed to aid heartbeats as a sinoatrial node (SAN), which is part of the electrical cardiac conduction system.We are reprogramming the cardiac progenitor cell and guiding it to become a conducting cell of the heart to conduct electrical current, said study co-author Bradley McConnell, associate professor of pharmacology, in a press release. Results of this study show that the SHT5 combination of transcription factors can reprogram CPCs into Pacemaker-like cells.

The Next Generation of Biologic Pacemakers? New Discovery in Stem Cells from Fat Creates Another Alternative Treatment

Diabetes mellitus is an independent predictor for heart failure, according to the findings of a study published inMayo Clinic Proceedings. In this study, using the Rochester Epidemiology Project, researchers assessed the long-term impact ofdiabeteson the development of heart failure by including 116 study subjects with diabetes, who were matched 1:2 based on age, hypertension, sex, coronary artery disease and diastolic with 232 participants without diabetes. The results showed that that diabetes is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure. Over the duration of 10 years, 21% of participants with diabetes developed heart failure, independent of other causes. The researchers observed that by comparison, only 12% of patients without diabetes developed heart failure. The key takeaway is that diabetes mellitus alone is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure, wrote one of the authors.

Diabetes is an Independent Predictor for Heart Failure

A new study suggests that regularly getting a good nights sleep isnt just a helpful overall health recommendation but is also an essential way to keep risk for heart disease and stroke down. The paper, published in theEuropean Journal of Cardiology, included more than 300,000 participants initially free of cardiovascular disease (CVD) from UK Biobank. According to the results, there were 7,280 documented cases of incident CVD (4,667 coronary heart disease and 2,650 stroke) cases. Participants with a sleep score of 5 had a 35% reduced risk for CVD, a 34% reduced risk for coronary heart disease, and a 34% reduced risk for stroke when compared to participants with a score of 0-1.As with other findings from observational studies, our results indicate an association, not a causal relation, one of the authors said in a press release. However, these findings may motivate other investigations and, at least, suggest that it is essential to consider overall sleep behaviors when considering a persons risk of heart disease or stroke.

Getting Quality Sleep, and the Right Amount, Can Offset Genetic Susceptibility for Heart Disease and Stroke Risk

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Duke Researchers Garner Over $6 Million in NIH Funding to Fight Genetic Diseases – Duke Today

By daniellenierenberg

Hemophilia. Cystic fibrosis. Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Huntingtons disease. These are just a few of the thousands of disorders caused by mutations in the bodys DNA. Treating the root causes of these debilitating diseases has become possible only recently, thanks to the development of genome editing tools such as CRISPR, which can change DNA sequences in cells and tissues to correct fundamental errors at the sourcebut significant hurdles must be overcome before genome-editing treatments are ready for use in humans.

Enter the National Institutes of Health Common Funds Somatic Cell Genome Editing (SCGE) program, established in 2018 to help researchers develop and assess accurate, safe and effective genome editing therapies for use in the cells and tissues of the body (aka somatic cells) that are affected by each of these diseases.

Todaywith three ongoing grants totaling more than $6 million in research fundingDuke University is tied with Yale University, UC Berkeley and UC Davis for the most projects supported by the NIH SCGE Program.

In the 2019 SCGE awards cycle, Charles Gersbach, the Rooney Family Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and collaborators across Duke and North Carolina State University received two grants: the first will allow them to study how CRISPR genome editing affects engineered human muscle tissues, while the second project will develop new CRISPR tools to turn genes on and off rather than permanently alter the targeted DNA sequence. This work builds on a 2018 SCGE grant, led by Aravind Asokan, professor and director of gene therapy in the Department of Surgery, which focuses on using adeno-associated viruses to deliver gene editing tools to neuromuscular tissue.

There is an amazing team of engineers, scientists and clinicians at Duke and the broader Research Triangle coalescing around the challenges of studying and manipulating the human genome to treat diseasefrom delivery to modeling to building new tools, said Gersbach, who with his colleagues recently launched the Duke Center for Advanced Genomic Technologies (CAGT), a collaboration of the Pratt School of Engineering, Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, and School of Medicine. Were very excited to be at the center of those efforts and greatly appreciate the support of the NIH SCGE Program to realize this vision.

For their first grant, Gersbach will collaborate with fellow Duke biomedical engineering faculty Nenad Bursac and George Truskey to monitor how genome editing affects engineered human muscle tissue. Through their new project, the team will use human pluripotent stem cells to make human muscle tissues in the lab, specifically skeletal and cardiac muscle, which are often affected by genetic diseases. These systems will then serve as a more accurate model for monitoring the health of human tissues, on-target and off-target genome modifications, tissue regeneration, and possible immune responses during CRISPR-mediated genome editing.

Currently, most genetic testing occurs using animal models, but those dont always accurately replicate the human response to therapy, says Truskey, the Goodson Professor of Biomedical Engineering.

Bursac adds, We have a long history of engineering human cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues with the right cell types and physiology to model the response to gene editing systems like CRISPR. With these platforms, we hope to help predict how muscle will respond in a human trial.

Gersbach will work with Tim Reddy, a Duke associate professor of biostatistics and bioinformatics, and Rodolphe Barrangou, the Todd R. Klaenhammer Distinguished Professor in Probiotics Research at North Carolina State University, on the second grant. According to Gersbach, this has the potential to extend the impact of genome editing technologies to a greater diversity of diseases, as many common diseases, such as neurodegenerative and autoimmune conditions, result from too much or too little of certain genes rather than a single genetic mutation. This work builds on previous collaborations between Gersbach, Barrangou and Reddy developing both new CRISPR systems for gene regulation and to regulate the epigenome rather than permanently delete DNA sequences.

Aravind Asokan leads Dukes initial SCGE grant, which explores the the evolution of next generation of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), which have emerged as a safe and effective system to deliver gene therapies to targeted cells, especially those involved in neuromuscular diseases like spinal muscular atrophy, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other myopathies. However, delivery of genome editing tools to the stem cells of neuromuscular tissue is particularly challenging. This collaboration between Asokan and Gersbach builds on their previous work in using AAV and CRISPR to treat animal models of DMD.

We aim to correct mutations not just in the mature muscle cells, but also in the muscle stem cells that regenerate skeletal muscle tissue, explainsAsokan. This approach is critical to ensuring long-term stability of genome editing in muscle and ultimately we hope to establish a paradigm where our cross-cutting viral evolution approach can enable efficient editing in multiple organ systems.

Click through to learn more about the Duke Center for Advanced Genomic Technologies.

Read more:
Duke Researchers Garner Over $6 Million in NIH Funding to Fight Genetic Diseases - Duke Today

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Cardiac Rhythm Management Market Development, Key Opportunity and Analysis of Leading Players to 2015 To 2021 – Info Street Wire

By daniellenierenberg

Cardiac rhythm management refers to a process of monitoring functioning of the heart through devices. Cardiac rhythm management devices are used to provide therapeutic solutions to patients suffering from cardiac disorders such as cardiac arrhythmias, heart failure, and cardiac arrests. Cardiac disorders lead to irregular heartbeat. Technological advancements and rise in the number of deaths due to increasing incidences of heart diseases and increasing aging population are some of the major factors driving the cardiac rhythm management market. Heart disease is one of the primary causes of death in the U. S. Excess of alcohol consumption; smoking, high cholesterol levels, and obesity are some of the major causes of heart diseases.

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Cardiac rhythm management is conducted through two major devices: implantable cardiac rhythm devices and pacemakers. Implantable cardiac rhythm devices treat patients with an improper heartbeat. Based on the device, the cardiac rhythm management market can be segmented into defibrillators, pacemakers, cardiac resynchronization therapy devices, implantable defibrillators, and external defibrillators. Pacemakers are used to treat patients with a slow heartbeat. Based on the end user, the cardiac rhythm management market can be segmented into hospitals, home/ambulatory, and others.

North America has the largest market for cardiac rhythm management due to improved healthcare infrastructure, government initiatives, rise in incidences of cardiac disorders, growing number of deaths due to cardiovascular diseases,and increasing healthcare expenditure in the region. The North America market for cardiac rhythm management is followed by Europe. Asia is expected to witness high growth rate in the cardiac rhythm management market in the next few years due to increasing incidences of cardiovascular diseases, growing disposable income, rise in awareness regarding heart disorders and relevant treatments, and improving healthcare infrastructure in the region.

Increasing the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, technological advancements, rise in life expectancy, increasing awareness regarding cardiac disorders, and government initiatives are some of the major factors that are expected to drive the market for cardiac rhythm management. In addition, factors such as a rise in disposable income, increasing aging population, and high cost associated with heart disease treatment are expected to drive the market for cardiac rhythm management. However, economic downturn, reimbursement issues, the importance of biologics and stem cells, and inappropriate use of the devices are some of the factors restraining the growth of the global cardiac rhythm management market.

Growing population and economies in the developing countries such as India and China are expected to drive the growth of the cardiac rhythm management market in Asia. In addition,factors such as innovations along with technological advancements such as miniaturization, introduction of MRI pacemakers, biocompatible materials and durable batteries, and continuous rise in aging population and increasing cardiovascular diseases such as arrhythmias, stroke, and high blood pressure are expected to create new opportunities for the global cardiac rhythm management market. An increasing number of mergers and acquisitions, rise in the number of collaborations and partnerships, and new product launches are some of the latest trends in the global cardiac rhythm management market. Some of the major companies operating in the global cardiac rhythm management market are

Other companies with significant presence in the global cardiac rhythm management market include

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Key geographies evaluated in this report are:

Key features of this report

This post was originally published on Info Street Wire

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Stem Cell Assay Market Expected to Witness a Sustainable Growth over 2025 – Filmi Baba

By daniellenierenberg

Stem Cell Assay Market: Snapshot

Stem cell assay refers to the procedure of measuring the potency of antineoplastic drugs, on the basis of their capability of retarding the growth of human tumor cells. The assay consists of qualitative or quantitative analysis or testing of affected tissues and tumors, wherein their toxicity, impurity, and other aspects are studied.

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With the growing number of successful stem cell therapy treatment cases, the global market for stem cell assays will gain substantial momentum. A number of research and development projects are lending a hand to the growth of the market. For instance, the University of Washingtons Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine (ISCRM) has attempted to manipulate stem cells to heal eye, kidney, and heart injuries. A number of diseases such as Alzheimers, spinal cord injury, Parkinsons, diabetes, stroke, retinal disease, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and neurological diseases can be successfully treated via stem cell therapy. Therefore, stem cell assays will exhibit growing demand.

Another key development in the stem cell assay market is the development of innovative stem cell therapies. In April 2017, for instance, the first participant in an innovative clinical trial at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health was successfully treated with stem cell therapy. CardiAMP, the investigational therapy, has been designed to direct a large dose of the patients own bone-marrow cells to the point of cardiac injury, stimulating the natural healing response of the body.

Newer areas of application in medicine are being explored constantly. Consequently, stem cell assays are likely to play a key role in the formulation of treatments of a number of diseases.

Global Stem Cell Assay Market: Overview

The increasing investment in research and development of novel therapeutics owing to the rising incidence of chronic diseases has led to immense growth in the global stem cell assay market. In the next couple of years, the market is expected to spawn into a multi-billion dollar industry as healthcare sector and governments around the world increase their research spending.

The report analyzes the prevalent opportunities for the markets growth and those that companies should capitalize in the near future to strengthen their position in the market. It presents insights into the growth drivers and lists down the major restraints. Additionally, the report gauges the effect of Porters five forces on the overall stem cell assay market.

Global Stem Cell Assay Market: Key Market Segments

For the purpose of the study, the report segments the global stem cell assay market based on various parameters. For instance, in terms of assay type, the market can be segmented into isolation and purification, viability, cell identification, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and function. By kit, the market can be bifurcated into human embryonic stem cell kits and adult stem cell kits. Based on instruments, flow cytometer, cell imaging systems, automated cell counter, and micro electrode arrays could be the key market segments.

In terms of application, the market can be segmented into drug discovery and development, clinical research, and regenerative medicine and therapy. The growth witnessed across the aforementioned application segments will be influenced by the increasing incidence of chronic ailments which will translate into the rising demand for regenerative medicines. Finally, based on end users, research institutes and industry research constitute the key market segments.

The report includes a detailed assessment of the various factors influencing the markets expansion across its key segments. The ones holding the most lucrative prospects are analyzed, and the factors restraining its trajectory across key segments are also discussed at length.

Global Stem Cell Assay Market: Regional Analysis

Regionally, the market is expected to witness heightened demand in the developed countries across Europe and North America. The increasing incidence of chronic ailments and the subsequently expanding patient population are the chief drivers of the stem cell assay market in North America. Besides this, the market is also expected to witness lucrative opportunities in Asia Pacific and Rest of the World.

Global Stem Cell Assay Market: Vendor Landscape

A major inclusion in the report is the detailed assessment of the markets vendor landscape. For the purpose of the study the report therefore profiles some of the leading players having influence on the overall market dynamics. It also conducts SWOT analysis to study the strengths and weaknesses of the companies profiled and identify threats and opportunities that these enterprises are forecast to witness over the course of the reports forecast period.

Some of the most prominent enterprises operating in the global stem cell assay market are Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc (U.S.), Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. (U.S.), GE Healthcare (U.K.), Hemogenix Inc. (U.S.), Promega Corporation (U.S.), Bio-Techne Corporation (U.S.), Merck KGaA (Germany), STEMCELL Technologies Inc. (CA), Cell Biolabs, Inc. (U.S.), and Cellular Dynamics International, Inc. (U.S.).

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Suspended animation, you say? The biggest and freakiest scientific breakthroughs of 2019 – SYFY WIRE

By daniellenierenberg

Sci-fi is obviously bizarre. You see phenomena like parallel universes, holograms, suspended animation, human-animal hybrids, zombification ... wait. Things that could once only exist on a movie screen have now been invented in a lab or spawned on a petri dish. If there is one thing this past year taught us, its that actual science can be weirder than science fiction.

Whether they give you Avengers: Endgame realness or Doctor Who dj vu, or make you wonder what kind of Star Trek type of future were hurtling toward, the most incredible scientific discoveries weve unearthed in 2019 should blow your mind just a little.

While we cant yet just freeze human animation for a journey to Mars, doctors have made an incredible breakthrough. Acute trauma can escalate to cardiac arrest in minutes, but Dr. Samuel Tisherman and his team have figured out how to stop death in its tracks by inducing a near-death state. The process of emergency preservation and resuscitation (EPR) is a way of buying surgery time for patients suffering from potentially fatal injuries. Being that close to the brink and actually waking up is nothing short of unreal.

Sure, the holograms in Star Wars look real enough, but actual holograms go beyond special effects and into hardcore physics. The newest holograms on the scene upgrade even that technology because now, anyone who doesnt believe what they see can actually feel them. To achieve this, atiny polystyrene bead is trapped in a pocket of low air pressure, which levitates the bead.Its direction can be changed so fast that your brain will perceive those movements as visible and tangible shapes.

SYFY WIRE was there when Doubletree Hotels launched their famous cookie dough to the ISS along with an oven created especially for microgravity by Nanoracks and Zero-G Kitchen. Whats on the menu for astronauts is pretty limited, and proving that this experiment works could mean that we start seeing space burgers and pizza and just about anything that wouldnt result in a floating mess. If this works, it could mean anyone headed for the Moon or Mars wont solely exist on vacuum-packed dinners.

When a physicist who was an advisor on Avengers: Endgame says that infinite versions of you possiblyexist, there is going to be no way to unsee or unhear that. Sean Carroll believes that the universe can be in endless superpositions just like electrons used in quantum physics experiments. The only catch is that you have to believe those superpositions are real. While all these universes only exist in theory, that theory has yet to be disproved.

Just when we thought a disembodied brain like Krang from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles was impossible, scientists managed to grow organoid brains from stem cells. The eerie part is that these brains developed the same kind of spontaneous brain waves observed in premature babies. Nobody is out to create a Krang, but rather use these organoids to study autism and schizophrenia, which is already happening, and eventually Parkinsons, Alzheimers, and other diseases that attack the brain.

Regeneration might not just be for Gallifreyan time lords. Humans have been found to have regenerative ability in their cartilage, so even though we cant grow back entire limbs like an axolotl (yet), this could mean a breakthrough for restoring joint tissues and treating osteoarthritis.

Humanoid animals are no shock in sci-fi just think of the terrifying(and seductive) hybrid inSplice (above). But when Japan gave the go-ahead for experiments that will merge human and animal genes this summer, was it going too far? Human DNA will be spliced into animal embryos that will then be implanted into surrogate animal parents. Before you completely freak out, at least the reasoning behind this was that human DNA in animal organs will make it possible for more people to undergo successful organ transplants.

So maybe dinosaur de-extinction isnt happening, but cells extracted from a 28,000-year-old frozen mammoth specimen known as Yuka still did something unbelievable. The cells couldnt divide (which would have meant full zombification) but were actually able to get through some pre-division phases before they finally gave up. It was surprising the cells couldnt go further on a mummy so intact, so rule out an Ice Age version of Jurassic Park, at least for now.

Is it any surprise that the company whose search engine tookover cyberspace has now birthed the fastest computer processor ever? Googles 54-qubit Sycamore quantum processor can make ridiculously complex computations that would take the next fastest supercomputer on the planet 10,000 years to figure out. Obviously, nobodys got time for that. This artificial brain could also mean everything from lighter car batteries to lower carbon emissions, which were totally here for.

Next to everything hes blasted off into space with SpaceX (if it didn't explode first), the futuretech mogul has been advancing a system that could reverse neurological diseases and even make it possible to hook your brain up to AI someday. He also released a swarm of satellites to beam down space internet, and put out a car inspired by James Bonds Lotus Esprit submarine. Want lasers for windshield wipers? Hes working on that,too.

The thing about Musk is that hes a fearless innovator when it comes to tech that we only thought we could imagine or couldnt even imagine. You also know this is a man whos serious about building the future when he himself believes hell end up living on Mars.

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Gene Therapy Market 2019-2027 / Trends, Growth, Opportunities And Top Key – Market Research Sheets

By daniellenierenberg

The report covers the forecast and analysis of the gene therapy market on a global and regional level. The study provides historical data from 2015 to 2018 along with a forecast from 2019 to 2027 based on revenue (USD Million). The study includes drivers and restraints of the gene therapy market along with the impact they have on the demand over the forecast period. Additionally, the report includes the study of opportunities available in the gene therapy market on a global level.

In order to give the users of this report a comprehensive view of the gene therapy market, we have included a competitive landscape and an analysis of Porters Five Forces model for the market. The study encompasses a market attractiveness analysis, wherein all the segments are bench marked based on their market size, growth rate, and general attractiveness.

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The report provides company market share analysis to give a broader overview of the key players in the market. In addition, the report also covers key strategic developments of the market including acquisitions & mergers, new service launches, agreements, partnerships, collaborations & joint ventures, research & development, and regional expansion of major participants involved in the market on a global and regional basis.

The study provides a decisive view of the gene therapy market by segmenting the market based on the type, vector type, therapy area, and regions. All the segments have been analyzed based on present and future trends and the market is estimated from 2019 to 2027. The regional segmentation includes the current and forecast demand for North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America, and the Middle East and Africa.

Gene therapy is utilized for treating neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. Gene therapy is one of the key treatment kinds that will propel the market growth over the forecast period. Moreover, gene therapy also finds lucrative applications in precision medicine. In addition to this, a rise in the occurrence of cancer is prompting the demand to treat the disease through gene therapy.

Based on the type, the market can be segregated into Germ Line Gene Therapy and Somatic Gene Therapy. In terms of vector type, the gene therapy industry can be divided into Viral Vectors, Non-Viral Vectors, and Human Artificial Chromosome. On the basis of therapy area, the market for gene therapy can be classified into Cancer, Neurological Diseases, Infectious Diseases, Genetic Disorders, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Others.

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The key players included in this market are Advanced Cell & Gene Therapy, Audentes Therapeutics, Benitec Biopharma, Biogen, Blubird Bio, Inc., Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, CHIESI Farmaceutici SPA, Eurofins Scientific, Geneta Science, Genzyme Corporation, Gilead, GlaxoSmithKline PLC, Human Stem Cells institute, Novartis AG, Orchard Therapeutics, Pfizer Inc., Sangamo therapeutics, Spark therapeutics, and Voyager Therapeutics.

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Gene Therapy Market 2019-2027 / Trends, Growth, Opportunities And Top Key - Market Research Sheets

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3 innovative research projects coming out of the University of Houston – InnovationMap

By daniellenierenberg

University of Houston's C.T. Bauer College of Business has received its second largest donation to benefit its entrepreneurship program.

The Cyvia and Melvyn Wolff Center for Entrepreneurship, which was recently ranked the top undergraduate entrepreneurship program in the country, received the $13 million gift from its namesake foundation The Cyvia and Melvyn Wolff Family Foundation and the state of Texas is expected to match an additional $2 million, bringing the total impact to $15 million.

"Our family is deeply committed to the ideals of entrepreneurship," says Cyvia Wolff in a news release. "Our business personified everything that it means to be an entrepreneur. The skills, the thinking, the mindset are fundamental to success for business leaders today and in the future. On behalf of my late husband, we are truly honored to ensure the entrepreneurial legacy not only endures but remains accessible for students. We are truly honored to be part of this program and university."

The money will be used to create three endowments for the program. The Dave Cook Leadership Endowment, named for the center's director, Dave Cook, will be created and funded with $7 million of the donation to support leadership within the organization. For $4 million, the center will create the Wolff Legacy Endowment, which aims to increase students involved in the center, as well as the companies coming out of the program. The last $2 million will be used to create the Cyvia and Melvyn Wolff Endowed Chair(s)/Professorship(s) in Entrepreneurship. This initiative will support research and community outreach.

"We are passionate about entrepreneurship and how it can forever change students' lives," says Bauer Dean Paul A. Pavlou in the release. "We seek to further promote entrepreneurship as a university-wide, even citywide effort, by collaborating within and across the university in a multitude of areas, such as technology, health care, arts and sports."

The program was created in the mid '90s and was later renamed after Cyvia and Melvyn Wolff in 2007, and has seen great success over the past decade. In that time, Wolff students have created 1,270 businesses, with identified funding of just over $268 million. According to the release, the program has been ranked in the top two spots of the Princeton Review's top undergraduate entrepreneurship programs for nine of the past 12 years.

"Entrepreneurship is crucial for the future of our country, as well as our city and state," says UH President Renu Khator in the release. "We are proud to be at the forefront of work around entrepreneurial training and research. The uniqueness of our program has and continues to make it the model program. This extraordinary gift ensures our leadership in this space will continue and will support the creation of businesses, change communities and impact our students' lives."

At UH, 2,500 students take at least one entrepreneurship course a year, and more than 700 students complete certificate programs.

"What we are doing is transformative in the lives of students, mentors and stakeholders in a way that elevates everyone towards excellence," Cook, who was named the director of the program in 2017, says in the release. "The impact of this gift allows us to remain the leader and to move forward with confidence, purpose and permanence."

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Stem Cell Assay Market Predicted to Accelerate the Growth by 2017-2025 – News Cast Report

By daniellenierenberg

Stem Cell Assay Market: Snapshot

Stem cell assay refers to the procedure of measuring the potency of antineoplastic drugs, on the basis of their capability of retarding the growth of human tumor cells. The assay consists of qualitative or quantitative analysis or testing of affected tissues and tumors, wherein their toxicity, impurity, and other aspects are studied.

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With the growing number of successful stem cell therapy treatment cases, the global market for stem cell assays will gain substantial momentum. A number of research and development projects are lending a hand to the growth of the market. For instance, the University of Washingtons Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine (ISCRM) has attempted to manipulate stem cells to heal eye, kidney, and heart injuries. A number of diseases such as Alzheimers, spinal cord injury, Parkinsons, diabetes, stroke, retinal disease, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and neurological diseases can be successfully treated via stem cell therapy. Therefore, stem cell assays will exhibit growing demand.

Another key development in the stem cell assay market is the development of innovative stem cell therapies. In April 2017, for instance, the first participant in an innovative clinical trial at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health was successfully treated with stem cell therapy. CardiAMP, the investigational therapy, has been designed to direct a large dose of the patients own bone-marrow cells to the point of cardiac injury, stimulating the natural healing response of the body.

Newer areas of application in medicine are being explored constantly. Consequently, stem cell assays are likely to play a key role in the formulation of treatments of a number of diseases.

Global Stem Cell Assay Market: Overview

The increasing investment in research and development of novel therapeutics owing to the rising incidence of chronic diseases has led to immense growth in the global stem cell assay market. In the next couple of years, the market is expected to spawn into a multi-billion dollar industry as healthcare sector and governments around the world increase their research spending.

The report analyzes the prevalent opportunities for the markets growth and those that companies should capitalize in the near future to strengthen their position in the market. It presents insights into the growth drivers and lists down the major restraints. Additionally, the report gauges the effect of Porters five forces on the overall stem cell assay market.

Global Stem Cell Assay Market: Key Market Segments

For the purpose of the study, the report segments the global stem cell assay market based on various parameters. For instance, in terms of assay type, the market can be segmented into isolation and purification, viability, cell identification, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and function. By kit, the market can be bifurcated into human embryonic stem cell kits and adult stem cell kits. Based on instruments, flow cytometer, cell imaging systems, automated cell counter, and micro electrode arrays could be the key market segments.

In terms of application, the market can be segmented into drug discovery and development, clinical research, and regenerative medicine and therapy. The growth witnessed across the aforementioned application segments will be influenced by the increasing incidence of chronic ailments which will translate into the rising demand for regenerative medicines. Finally, based on end users, research institutes and industry research constitute the key market segments.

The report includes a detailed assessment of the various factors influencing the markets expansion across its key segments. The ones holding the most lucrative prospects are analyzed, and the factors restraining its trajectory across key segments are also discussed at length.

Global Stem Cell Assay Market: Regional Analysis

Regionally, the market is expected to witness heightened demand in the developed countries across Europe and North America. The increasing incidence of chronic ailments and the subsequently expanding patient population are the chief drivers of the stem cell assay market in North America. Besides this, the market is also expected to witness lucrative opportunities in Asia Pacific and Rest of the World.

Global Stem Cell Assay Market: Vendor Landscape

A major inclusion in the report is the detailed assessment of the markets vendor landscape. For the purpose of the study the report therefore profiles some of the leading players having influence on the overall market dynamics. It also conducts SWOT analysis to study the strengths and weaknesses of the companies profiled and identify threats and opportunities that these enterprises are forecast to witness over the course of the reports forecast period.

Some of the most prominent enterprises operating in the global stem cell assay market are Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc (U.S.), Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. (U.S.), GE Healthcare (U.K.), Hemogenix Inc. (U.S.), Promega Corporation (U.S.), Bio-Techne Corporation (U.S.), Merck KGaA (Germany), STEMCELL Technologies Inc. (CA), Cell Biolabs, Inc. (U.S.), and Cellular Dynamics International, Inc. (U.S.).

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The Next Generation of Biologic Pacemakers? New Discovery in Stem Cells from Fat Creates Another Alternative Treatment – DocWire News

By daniellenierenberg

A research team from the University of Houston has found a way to use the stem cells found in fat and guide it to become a pacemaker-like cell, according to a new study.

We are reprogramming the cardiac progenitor cell and guiding it to become a conducting cell of the heart to conduct electrical current, said study co-author Bradley McConnell, associate professor of pharmacology, in a press release

The team, publishing the study in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, worked on converting adipogenic mesenchymal stem cells, which reside within fat cells, into cardia progenitor cells. The ensuing cardiac progenitor cells can be programmed to aid heartbeats as a sinoatrial node (SAN), which is part of the electrical cardiac conduction system.

The researchers used what they called a standard screening strategy to test for reprogramming factors for converting human cardiac progenitor cells into pacemaker-like cells. According to their study results, the authors observed expressions of many pacemaker-specific genes, including CX30.2, KCNN4, HCN4, HCN3, HCN1, and SCN3b. The authors wrote that SHOX2, HCN2, and TBX5 (SHT5) combinations of transcription factors were much better candidate(s) in driving cardiac progenitor cells into pacemaker-like cells than other combinations and single transcription factors.

Results of this study show that the SHT5 combination of transcription factors can reprogram CPCs into Pacemaker-like cells, they wrote in their conclusion. SHT5 may be used as a potential stem cell therapy for sick sinus syndrome (SSS) and for other cardiac conduction diseases.

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The Art of Origami is Now A Key Tool That Helps Doctors Save Lives – Nature World News

By daniellenierenberg

Dec 23, 2019 05:03 AM EST

Origami's new role in the field of science and technology has definitely taken a turn for the better in the recent decade. Better known as origami engineering, the practice is used to reduce structures or maximize space and function.

Origami engineering has made great strides in the medical field in particular. The same principles used in origami, when applied to medical devices, allows implants to be folded to minuscule sizes and then unfolded to its actual size. The reverse is also applicable, where like toothpaste tubes, can be fully de-compressed.

Folding techniques could transform flat objects with wrinkles to increase resilience, shock-absorbance, strength, or rigidity. Origami provides a unique insight into how single pieces could sustainably be packaged without cutting, welding, or riveting, allowing for cheaper manufacturing costs and easier assembly.

The utility of origami engineering has captured the attention of people such as Rebecca Taylor, assistant professor at Carnegie Mellon University's Department of Mechanical Engineering. Taylor specializes in microfabrication and biomechanics, a study that has helped her fabricate microscale sensors to reliably assess cardiomyocytes derived from stem cells. A natural inclination to similar practice, Dr. Taylor has developed an origami-based DNA synthetic cardiac contractile protein, which allowed her to observe merging mechanics in multiprotein, acto-myosinc contractile systems.

As a professor, Taylor expands on the utilization of DNA origami in medicine. This technique (also referred to by Dr. Taylor as "bottom-up manufacturing"), allows improvement in nanomanufacturing and nanomechanics of multiprotein systems, paving the way for heart stents that could unfold in a very precise location.

The problem, however, is on how to deploy these structures in a 100% fault-free way. To illustrate this, a common problem that impedes the creation of pop-up tents that could self-assemble at the press of the button is when the folds of the tent get stuck during the folding process on occasion.

Understandably, this raises some concern among those who are keen to use self-folding nanomachines in medicine.

So this is where origami comes in.

According to University of Chicago scientists, the limits of self-folding structures could be intrinsic in that so-called "sticking points" seem to be unavoidable.

Previously thought possible to engineer around, the researchers observed the capacity of foldable structures by creating mathematical models. During the experiment, the team had designed structures capable of self-folding, such as paper origami and nanobots, and creating creases in them beforehand. The result was that when more pre-creases were added to the folds, the more branches in the next folding process could form and the more likely the self-folding mechanism is to get stuck.

Origami engineering is a relatively new innovation. Its application is vast and can be of use to not only technology but to medicine as well. The development of the field itself, then, needs to pick up at a faster pace in order to cater to the intelligent design of foldable structures and materials. But while there are creases in the field that needs to be smoothed out, the greater promise of origami engineering has brought about several research papers in its wake.

RELATED ARTICLE: Swallowed a Battery? Ingestible Origami Robot Made from Pig Gut Can Remove It,Stop Stomach Bleeding

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Stem Cell Therapy Market Consumer Outlook 2025 | MEDIPOST Co., Ltd., Osiris Therapeutics, Inc. – Market Research Sheets

By daniellenierenberg

Stem Cell Therapy Market: Snapshot

Of late, there has been an increasing awareness regarding the therapeutic potential of stem cells for management of diseases which is boosting the growth of the stem cell therapy market. The development of advanced genome based cell analysis techniques, identification of new stem cell lines, increasing investments in research and development as well as infrastructure development for the processing and banking of stem cell are encouraging the growth of the global stem cell therapy market.

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One of the key factors boosting the growth of this market is the limitations of traditional organ transplantation such as the risk of infection, rejection, and immunosuppression risk. Another drawback of conventional organ transplantation is that doctors have to depend on organ donors completely. All these issues can be eliminated, by the application of stem cell therapy. Another factor which is helping the growth in this market is the growing pipeline and development of drugs for emerging applications. Increased research studies aiming to widen the scope of stem cell will also fuel the growth of the market. Scientists are constantly engaged in trying to find out novel methods for creating human stem cells in response to the growing demand for stem cell production to be used for disease management.

It is estimated that the dermatology application will contribute significantly the growth of the global stem cell therapy market. This is because stem cell therapy can help decrease the after effects of general treatments for burns such as infections, scars, and adhesion. The increasing number of patients suffering from diabetes and growing cases of trauma surgery will fuel the adoption of stem cell therapy in the dermatology segment.

Global Stem Cell Therapy Market: Overview

Also called regenerative medicine, stem cell therapy encourages the reparative response of damaged, diseased, or dysfunctional tissue via the use of stem cells and their derivatives. Replacing the practice of organ transplantations, stem cell therapies have eliminated the dependence on availability of donors. Bone marrow transplant is perhaps the most commonly employed stem cell therapy.

Osteoarthritis, cerebral palsy, heart failure, multiple sclerosis and even hearing loss could be treated using stem cell therapies. Doctors have successfully performed stem cell transplants that significantly aid patients fight cancers such as leukemia and other blood-related diseases.

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Global Stem Cell Therapy Market: Key Trends

The key factors influencing the growth of the global stem cell therapy market are increasing funds in the development of new stem lines, the advent of advanced genomic procedures used in stem cell analysis, and greater emphasis on human embryonic stem cells. As the traditional organ transplantations are associated with limitations such as infection, rejection, and immunosuppression along with high reliance on organ donors, the demand for stem cell therapy is likely to soar. The growing deployment of stem cells in the treatment of wounds and damaged skin, scarring, and grafts is another prominent catalyst of the market.

On the contrary, inadequate infrastructural facilities coupled with ethical issues related to embryonic stem cells might impede the growth of the market. However, the ongoing research for the manipulation of stem cells from cord blood cells, bone marrow, and skin for the treatment of ailments including cardiovascular and diabetes will open up new doors for the advancement of the market.

Global Stem Cell Therapy Market: Market Potential

A number of new studies, research projects, and development of novel therapies have come forth in the global market for stem cell therapy. Several of these treatments are in the pipeline, while many others have received approvals by regulatory bodies.

In March 2017, Belgian biotech company TiGenix announced that its cardiac stem cell therapy, AlloCSC-01 has successfully reached its phase I/II with positive results. Subsequently, it has been approved by the U.S. FDA. If this therapy is well- received by the market, nearly 1.9 million AMI patients could be treated through this stem cell therapy.

Another significant development is the granting of a patent to Israel-based Kadimastem Ltd. for its novel stem-cell based technology to be used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other similar conditions of the nervous system. The companys technology used for producing supporting cells in the central nervous system, taken from human stem cells such as myelin-producing cells is also covered in the patent.

Global Stem Cell Therapy Market: Regional Outlook

The global market for stem cell therapy can be segmented into Asia Pacific, North America, Latin America, Europe, and the Middle East and Africa. North America emerged as the leading regional market, triggered by the rising incidence of chronic health conditions and government support. Europe also displays significant growth potential, as the benefits of this therapy are increasingly acknowledged.

Asia Pacific is slated for maximum growth, thanks to the massive patient pool, bulk of investments in stem cell therapy projects, and the increasing recognition of growth opportunities in countries such as China, Japan, and India by the leading market players.

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Global Stem Cell Therapy Market: Competitive Analysis

Several firms are adopting strategies such as mergers and acquisitions, collaborations, and partnerships, apart from product development with a view to attain a strong foothold in the global market for stem cell therapy.

Some of the major companies operating in the global market for stem cell therapy are RTI Surgical, Inc., MEDIPOST Co., Ltd., Osiris Therapeutics, Inc., NuVasive, Inc., Pharmicell Co., Ltd., Anterogen Co., Ltd., JCR Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., and Holostem Terapie Avanzate S.r.l.

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BeiGene Announces Acceptance of a Supplemental New Drug Application in China for REVLIMID in Relapsed or Refractory Indolent Lymphoma – BioSpace

By daniellenierenberg

BEIJING, China and CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Dec. 22, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- BeiGene, Ltd. (NASDAQ: BGNE; HKEX: 06160), a commercial-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing innovative molecularly-targeted and immuno-oncology drugs for the treatment of cancer, today announced that the China National Medical Products Administration (NMPA) has accepted a supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for REVLIMID (lenalidomide), in combination with rituximab, for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory indolent lymphoma (follicular lymphoma or marginal zone lymphoma). REVLIMID was first approved in China in 2013 for the treatment of multiple myeloma in combination with dexamethasone, in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy, and the label for the combination was expanded in 2018 to include adult patients with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) who are not eligible for transplant. It is currently marketed in China by BeiGene under an exclusive license from Celgene Logistics Sarl, a Bristol-Myers Squibb company.

This milestone for REVLIMID marks another step in the expansion of our hematology franchise into non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) in China, where significant unmet medical needs remain. Together with the pending approvals of tislelizumab for Hodgkins lymphoma and zanubrutinib for mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia as well as Revlimid for multiple myeloma, Vidaza for myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia and additional products from the collaboration we have announced with Amgen, we are working to build a market-leading presence in the treatment of hematological cancers in China, said Dr. Xiaobin Wu, General Manager of China and President of BeiGene. We are excited about this opportunity and look forward to working closely with Bristol-Myers Squibb and the NMPA to bring this chemotherapy-free treatment option to patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma or marginal zone lymphoma in China as soon as possible.

The sNDA is supported by a clinical, non-clinical, and chemistry, manufacturing and control (CMC) data package, including the results from the pivotal Phase 3 AUGMENT study (NCT01938001) sponsored and conducted by Bristol-Myers Squibb. AUGMENT is a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial in which a total of 358 patients with relapsed or refractory follicular or marginal zone lymphoma were randomized 1:1 to receive REVLIMID and rituximab (R2) or rituximab and placebo. With a median follow-up of 28.3 months (range: 0.1 to 51.3 months), R2 demonstrated clinically meaningful and statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), evaluated by an independent review committee (IRC), relative to the control arm with a 54% reduction in the risk of progression or death (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.34, 0.62; p < 0.0001). The median PFS was 39.4 months for the R2 arm and 14.1 months for the control arm with an improvement by more than 2 years. Overall response rate (ORR), a secondary endpoint, was 78% in the R2 arm vs. 53% in the control arm, as assessed by the IRC. Duration of response (DoR) was significantly improved for R2 vs. control with median DoR of 37 vs. 22 months, respectively (P =0.0015; HR: 0.53; 95% CI, 0.36-0.79). The most frequent adverse event (AE) in the R2 arm was neutropenia (58%), vs. 22% in the control arm. Additional commonly observed AEs in more than 20% of patients included diarrhea (31% in the R2 arm vs. 23% in the control arm), constipation (26% vs. 14%), cough (23% vs. 17%), and fatigue (22% vs. 18%). Adverse events that were reported at a higher rate (>10%) in the R2 arm were neutropenia, constipation, leukopenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia and tumor flare.

About follicular lymphoma (FL) and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL)

FL and MZL are two major types of indolent lymphomas;1 FL is the most common subtype, constituting approximately 20% to 25% of all NHL,2 followed by MZL (approximately 5% to 17% of all NHLs).3 NHL incidence in China is 88,090 according to the World Health Organizations Globocan 2018 database.4 Given the incurable nature of relapsed or refractory FL/MZL, the efficacy and safety limitations of current treatment options, and the fact that patients are typically older and with comorbidities, a high unmet medical need exists for the development of novel treatment options with new differentiated mechanisms of action and a more tolerable safety profile that can improve the quality of response and PFS in the setting of previously treated FL/MZL.

About REVLIMID

In China, REVLIMID was approved in combination with dexamethasone for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) who are not eligible for transplant in 2018. It received approval in China in 2013 for the treatment of multiple myeloma in combination with dexamethasone in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy.

REVLIMID is approved in Europe and the United States as monotherapy, indicated for the maintenance treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed MM who have undergone autologous stem cell transplantation. REVLIMID as combination therapy is approved in Europe, in the United States, in Japan and in around 25 other countries for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated MM who are not eligible for transplant. REVLIMID is also approved in combination with dexamethasone for the treatment of patients with MM who have received at least one prior therapy in nearly 70 countries, encompassing Europe, the Americas, the Middle-East and Asia, and in combination with dexamethasone for the treatment of patients whose disease has progressed after one therapy in Australia and New Zealand.

REVLIMID is also approved in the United States, Canada, Switzerland, Australia, New Zealand and several Latin American countries, as well as Malaysia and Israel, for transfusion-dependent anaemia due to low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) associated with a deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality with or without additional cytogenetic abnormalities and in Europe for the treatment of patients with transfusion-dependent anemia due to low- or intermediate-1-risk MDS associated with an isolated deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality when other therapeutic options are insufficient or inadequate.

In addition, REVLIMID is approved in Europe for the treatment of patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and in the United States for the treatment of patients with MCL whose disease has relapsed or progressed after two prior therapies, one of which included bortezomib. In Switzerland, REVLIMID is indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory MCL after prior therapy that included bortezomib and chemotherapy/rituximab.

REVLIMID is not indicated and is not recommended for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) outside of controlled clinical trials.

U.S. Indications for REVLIMID

REVLIMID (lenalidomide) in combination with dexamethasone (dex) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with multiple myeloma (MM).

REVLIMID is indicated as maintenance therapy in adult patients with MM following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT).

REVLIMID is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with transfusion-dependent anemia due to low-or intermediate-1risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) associated with a deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality with or without additional cytogenetic abnormalities.

REVLIMID is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) whose disease has relapsed or progressed after two prior therapies, one of which included bortezomib.

REVLIMID in combination with a rituximab product is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with previously treated follicular lymphoma (FL).

REVLIMID in combination with a rituximab product is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with previously treated marginal zone lymphoma (MZL).

REVLIMID is not indicated and is not recommended for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) outside of controlled clinical trials.

REVLIMID is only available through a restricted distribution program, REVLIMID REMS.

Important Safety Information

WARNING: EMBRYO-FETAL TOXICITY, HEMATOLOGIC TOXICITY, and VENOUS and ARTERIAL THROMBOEMBOLISM

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Do not use REVLIMID during pregnancy. Lenalidomide, a thalidomide analogue, caused limb abnormalities in a developmental monkey study. Thalidomide is a known human teratogen that causes severe life-threatening human birth defects. If lenalidomide is used during pregnancy, it may cause birth defects or embryo-fetal death. In females of reproductive potential, obtain 2 negative pregnancy tests before starting REVLIMID treatment. Females of reproductive potential must use 2 forms of contraception or continuously abstain from heterosexual sex during and for 4 weeks after REVLIMID treatment. To avoid embryo-fetal exposure to lenalidomide, REVLIMID is only available through a restricted distribution program, the REVLIMID REMS program.

Information about the REVLIMID REMS program is available at http://www.celgeneriskmanagement.com or by calling the manufacturers toll-free number 1-888-423-5436.

Hematologic Toxicity (Neutropenia and Thrombocytopenia)

REVLIMID can cause significant neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Eighty percent of patients with del 5q MDS had to have a dose delay/reduction during the major study. Thirty-four percent of patients had to have a second dose delay/reduction. Grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicity was seen in 80% of patients enrolled in the study. Patients on therapy for del 5q MDS should have their complete blood counts monitored weekly for the first 8 weeks of therapy and at least monthly thereafter. Patients may require dose interruption and/or reduction. Patients may require use of blood product support and/or growth factors.

Venous and Arterial Thromboembolism

REVLIMID has demonstrated a significantly increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), as well as risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with MM who were treated with REVLIMID and dexamethasone therapy. Monitor for and advise patients about signs and symptoms of thromboembolism. Advise patients to seek immediate medical care if they develop symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, or arm or leg swelling. Thromboprophylaxis is recommended and the choice of regimen should be based on an assessment of the patients underlying risks.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Pregnancy: REVLIMID can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant female and is contraindicated in females who are pregnant. If this drug is used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential risk to the fetus.

Severe Hypersensitivity Reactions: REVLIMID is contraindicated in patients who have demonstrated severe hypersensitivity (e.g., angioedema, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis) to lenalidomide.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: See Boxed WARNINGS.

REVLIMID REMS Program: See Boxed WARNINGS. Prescribers and pharmacies must be certified with the REVLIMID REMS program by enrolling and complying with the REMS requirements; pharmacies must only dispense to patients who are authorized to receive REVLIMID. Patients must sign a Patient-Physician Agreement Form and comply with REMS requirements; female patients of reproductive potential who are not pregnant must comply with the pregnancy testing and contraception requirements and males must comply with contraception requirements.

Hematologic Toxicity: REVLIMID can cause significant neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Monitor patients with neutropenia for signs of infection. Advise patients to observe for bleeding or bruising, especially with use of concomitant medications that may increase risk of bleeding. Patients may require a dose interruption and/or dose reduction. MM: Monitor complete blood counts (CBC) in patients taking REVLIMID + dexamethasone or REVLIMID as maintenance therapy, every 7 days for the first 2 cycles, on days 1 and 15 of cycle 3, and every 28 days thereafter. MDS: Monitor CBC in patients on therapy for del 5q MDS, weekly for the first 8 weeks of therapy and at least monthly thereafter. See Boxed WARNINGS for further information. MCL: Monitor CBC in patients taking REVLIMID for MCL weekly for the first cycle (28 days), every 2 weeks during cycles 2-4, and then monthly thereafter. FL/MZL: Monitor CBC in patients taking REVLIMID for FL or MZL weekly for the first 3 weeks of Cycle 1 (28 days), every 2 weeks during Cycles 2-4, and then monthly thereafter.

Venous and Arterial Thromboembolism: See Boxed WARNINGS. Venous thromboembolic events (DVT and PE) and arterial thromboses (MI and CVA) are increased in patients treated with REVLIMID. Patients with known risk factors, including prior thrombosis, may be at greater risk and actions should be taken to try to minimize all modifiable factors (e.g., hyperlipidemia, hypertension, smoking). Thromboprophylaxis is recommended and the regimen should be based on the patients underlying risks. ESAs and estrogens may further increase the risk of thrombosis and their use should be based on a benefit-risk decision.

Increased Mortality in Patients With CLL: In a clinical trial in the first-line treatment of patients with CLL, single-agent REVLIMID therapy increased the risk of death as compared to single-agent chlorambucil. Serious adverse cardiovascular reactions, including atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, and cardiac failure, occurred more frequently in the REVLIMID arm. REVLIMID is not indicated and not recommended for use in CLL outside of controlled clinical trials.

Second Primary Malignancies (SPM): In clinical trials in patients with MM receiving REVLIMID and in patients with FL or MZL receiving REVLIMID + rituximab therapy, an increase of hematologic plus solid tumor SPM, notably AML, have been observed. In patients with MM, MDS was also observed. Monitor patients for the development of SPM. Take into account both the potential benefit of REVLIMID and risk of SPM when considering treatment.

Increased Mortality With Pembrolizumab: In clinical trials in patients with MM, the addition of pembrolizumab to a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone resulted in increased mortality. Treatment of patients with MM with a PD-1 or PD-L1 blocking antibody in combination with a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone is not recommended outside of controlled clinical trials.

Hepatotoxicity: Hepatic failure, including fatal cases, has occurred in patients treated with REVLIMID + dexamethasone. Pre-existing viral liver disease, elevated baseline liver enzymes, and concomitant medications may be risk factors. Monitor liver enzymes periodically. Stop REVLIMID upon elevation of liver enzymes. After return to baseline values, treatment at a lower dose may be considered.

Severe Cutaneous Reactions: Severe cutaneous reactions including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) have been reported. These events can be fatal. Patients with a prior history of Grade 4 rash associated with thalidomide treatment should not receive REVLIMID. Consider REVLIMID interruption or discontinuation for Grade 2-3 skin rash. Permanently discontinue REVLIMID for Grade 4 rash, exfoliative or bullous rash, or for other severe cutaneous reactions such as SJS, TEN, or DRESS.

Tumor Lysis Syndrome (TLS): Fatal instances of TLS have been reported during treatment with REVLIMID. The patients at risk of TLS are those with high tumor burden prior to treatment. Closely monitor patients at risk and take appropriate preventive approaches.

Tumor Flare Reaction (TFR): TFR has occurred during investigational use of REVLIMID for CLL and lymphoma. Monitoring and evaluation for TFR is recommended in patients with MCL, FL, or MZL. Tumor flare may mimic the progression of disease (PD). In patients with Grade 3 or 4 TFR, it is recommended to withhold treatment with REVLIMID until TFR resolves to Grade 1. REVLIMID may be continued in patients with Grade 1 and 2 TFR without interruption or modification, at the physicians discretion.

Impaired Stem Cell Mobilization: A decrease in the number of CD34+ cells collected after treatment (>4 cycles) with REVLIMID has been reported. Consider early referral to transplant center to optimize timing of the stem cell collection.

Thyroid Disorders: Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism have been reported. Measure thyroid function before starting REVLIMID treatment and during therapy.

Early Mortality in Patients With MCL: In another MCL study, there was an increase in early deaths (within 20 weeks); 12.9% in the REVLIMID arm versus 7.1% in the control arm. Risk factors for early deaths include high tumor burden, MIPI score at diagnosis, and high WBC at baseline (10 x 109/L).

Hypersensitivity: Hypersensitivity, including angioedema, anaphylaxis, and anaphylactic reactions to REVLIMID has been reported. Permanently discontinue REVLIMID for angioedema and anaphylaxis.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Multiple Myeloma

Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Follicular Lymphoma/Marginal Zone Lymphoma

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Periodically monitor digoxin plasma levels due to increased Cmax and AUC with concomitant REVLIMID therapy. Patients taking concomitant therapies such as erythropoietin-stimulating agents or estrogen-containing therapies may have an increased risk of thrombosis. It is not known whether there is an interaction between dexamethasone and warfarin. Close monitoring of PT and INR is recommended in patients with MM taking concomitant warfarin.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS, for REVLIMID.

Please see the rituximab full Prescribing Information for Important Safety Information at http://www.rituxan.com.

About BeiGene

BeiGene is a global, commercial-stage, research-based biotechnology company focused on molecularly-targeted and immuno-oncology cancer therapeutics. With a team of over 3,000 employees in the United States, China, Australia, and Europe; BeiGene is advancing a pipeline consisting of novel oral small molecules and monoclonal antibodies for cancer. BeiGene is also working to create combination solutions aimed to have both a meaningful and lasting impact on cancer patients. In the United States, BeiGene markets and distributes BRUKINSA (zanubrutinib) and in China, the Company markets ABRAXANE (paclitaxel for injection [albumin bound]), REVLIMID (lenalidomide), and VIDAZA (azacitidine) under a license from Celgene Logistics Sarl, a Bristol-Myers Squibb company.5

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other federal securities laws, including statements regarding BeiGenes plans and expectations for further development and commercialization of REVLIMID in China and the potential implications for patients. Actual results may differ materially from those indicated in the forward-looking statements as a result of various important factors, including BeiGene's ability to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of its drug candidates; the clinical results for its drug candidates, which may not support further development or marketing approval; actions of regulatory agencies, which may affect the initiation, timing and progress of clinical trials and marketing approval; BeiGene's ability to achieve commercial success for its marketed products and drug candidates, if approved; BeiGene's ability to obtain and maintain protection of intellectual property for its technology and drugs; BeiGene's reliance on third parties to conduct drug development, manufacturing and other services; BeiGenes limited operating history and BeiGene's ability to obtain additional funding for operations and to complete the development and commercialization of its drug candidates, as well as those risks more fully discussed in the section entitled Risk Factors in BeiGenes most recent quarterly report on Form 10-Q, as well as discussions of potential risks, uncertainties, and other important factors in BeiGene's subsequent filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. All information in this press release is as of the date of this press release, and BeiGene undertakes no duty to update such information unless required by law.

______________________1 Bello C, Zhang L, Naghashpour M. Follicular lymphoma: current management and future directions. Cancer Control. 2012;19:187-95.

2 Sousou T, Friedberg J. Rituximab in indolent lymphomas. Semin Hematol. 2010; 47(2):133-42.

3 Zinzani, P. L. (2012). The many faces of marginal zone lymphoma. Hematology, 2012(1), 426432.

4 https://gco.iarc.fr/

5 ABRAXANE is registered trademark of Abraxis Bioscience LLC, a Bristol-Myers Squibb company; REVLIMID and VIDAZA are registered trademarks of Celgene Corporation, a Bristol-Myers Squibb company.

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BeiGene Announces Acceptance of a Supplemental New Drug Application in China for REVLIMID in Relapsed or Refractory Indolent Lymphoma - BioSpace

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BeiGene Announces Acceptance of a Supplemental New Drug Application in China for REVLIMID in Relapsed or Refractory Indolent Lymphoma – GlobeNewswire

By daniellenierenberg

BEIJING, China and CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Dec. 22, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- BeiGene, Ltd. (NASDAQ: BGNE; HKEX: 06160), a commercial-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing innovative molecularly-targeted and immuno-oncology drugs for the treatment of cancer, today announced that the China National Medical Products Administration (NMPA) has accepted a supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for REVLIMID (lenalidomide), in combination with rituximab, for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory indolent lymphoma (follicular lymphoma or marginal zone lymphoma). REVLIMID was first approved in China in 2013 for the treatment of multiple myeloma in combination with dexamethasone, in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy, and the label for the combination was expanded in 2018 to include adult patients with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) who are not eligible for transplant. It is currently marketed in China by BeiGene under an exclusive license from Celgene Logistics Sarl, a Bristol-Myers Squibb company.

This milestone for REVLIMID marks another step in the expansion of our hematology franchise into non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) in China, where significant unmet medical needs remain. Together with the pending approvals of tislelizumab for Hodgkins lymphoma and zanubrutinib for mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia as well as Revlimid for multiple myeloma, Vidaza for myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia and additional products from the collaboration we have announced with Amgen, we are working to build a market-leading presence in the treatment of hematological cancers in China, said Dr. Xiaobin Wu, General Manager of China and President of BeiGene. We are excited about this opportunity and look forward to working closely with Bristol-Myers Squibb and the NMPA to bring this chemotherapy-free treatment option to patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma or marginal zone lymphoma in China as soon as possible.

The sNDA is supported by a clinical, non-clinical, and chemistry, manufacturing and control (CMC) data package, including the results from the pivotal Phase 3 AUGMENT study (NCT01938001) sponsored and conducted by Bristol-Myers Squibb. AUGMENT is a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial in which a total of 358 patients with relapsed or refractory follicular or marginal zone lymphoma were randomized 1:1 to receive REVLIMID and rituximab (R2) or rituximab and placebo. With a median follow-up of 28.3 months (range: 0.1 to 51.3 months), R2 demonstrated clinically meaningful and statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), evaluated by an independent review committee (IRC), relative to the control arm with a 54% reduction in the risk of progression or death (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.34, 0.62; p < 0.0001). The median PFS was 39.4 months for the R2 arm and 14.1 months for the control arm with an improvement by more than 2 years. Overall response rate (ORR), a secondary endpoint, was 78% in the R2 arm vs. 53% in the control arm, as assessed by the IRC. Duration of response (DoR) was significantly improved for R2 vs. control with median DoR of 37 vs. 22 months, respectively (P =0.0015; HR: 0.53; 95% CI, 0.36-0.79). The most frequent adverse event (AE) in the R2 arm was neutropenia (58%), vs. 22% in the control arm. Additional commonly observed AEs in more than 20% of patients included diarrhea (31% in the R2 arm vs. 23% in the control arm), constipation (26% vs. 14%), cough (23% vs. 17%), and fatigue (22% vs. 18%). Adverse events that were reported at a higher rate (>10%) in the R2 arm were neutropenia, constipation, leukopenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia and tumor flare.

About follicular lymphoma (FL) and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL)

FL and MZL are two major types of indolent lymphomas;1 FL is the most common subtype, constituting approximately 20% to 25% of all NHL,2 followed by MZL (approximately 5% to 17% of all NHLs).3 NHL incidence in China is 88,090 according to the World Health Organizations Globocan 2018 database.4 Given the incurable nature of relapsed or refractory FL/MZL, the efficacy and safety limitations of current treatment options, and the fact that patients are typically older and with comorbidities, a high unmet medical need exists for the development of novel treatment options with new differentiated mechanisms of action and a more tolerable safety profile that can improve the quality of response and PFS in the setting of previously treated FL/MZL.

About REVLIMID

In China, REVLIMID was approved in combination with dexamethasone for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) who are not eligible for transplant in 2018. It received approval in China in 2013 for the treatment of multiple myeloma in combination with dexamethasone in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy.

REVLIMID is approved in Europe and the United States as monotherapy, indicated for the maintenance treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed MM who have undergone autologous stem cell transplantation. REVLIMIDas combination therapy is approved inEurope, inthe United States, inJapanand in around 25 other countries for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated MM who are not eligible for transplant. REVLIMID is also approved in combination with dexamethasone for the treatment of patients with MM who have received at least one prior therapy in nearly 70 countries, encompassingEurope, theAmericas, theMiddle-EastandAsia, and in combination with dexamethasone for the treatment of patients whose disease has progressed after one therapy inAustralia and New Zealand.

REVLIMIDis also approved inthe United States,Canada,Switzerland,Australia,New Zealandand several Latin American countries, as well asMalaysiaandIsrael, for transfusion-dependent anaemia due to low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) associated with a deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality with or without additional cytogenetic abnormalities and inEuropefor the treatment of patients with transfusion-dependent anemia due to low- or intermediate-1-risk MDS associated with an isolated deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality when other therapeutic options are insufficient or inadequate.

In addition, REVLIMIDis approved inEuropefor the treatment of patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and inthe United Statesfor the treatment of patients with MCL whose disease has relapsed or progressed after two prior therapies, one of which included bortezomib. InSwitzerland, REVLIMID is indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory MCL after prior therapy that included bortezomib and chemotherapy/rituximab.

REVLIMID is not indicated and is not recommended for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) outside of controlled clinical trials.

U.S. Indications for REVLIMID

REVLIMID (lenalidomide) in combination with dexamethasone (dex) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with multiple myeloma (MM).

REVLIMID is indicated as maintenance therapy in adult patients with MM following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT).

REVLIMID is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with transfusion-dependent anemia due to low-or intermediate-1risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) associated with a deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality with or without additional cytogenetic abnormalities.

REVLIMID is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) whose disease has relapsed or progressed after two prior therapies, one of which included bortezomib.

REVLIMID in combination with a rituximab product is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with previously treated follicular lymphoma (FL).

REVLIMID in combination with a rituximab product is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with previously treated marginal zone lymphoma (MZL).

REVLIMID is not indicated and is not recommended for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) outside of controlled clinical trials.

REVLIMID is only available through a restricted distribution program, REVLIMID REMS.

Important Safety Information

WARNING: EMBRYO-FETAL TOXICITY, HEMATOLOGIC TOXICITY, and VENOUS and ARTERIAL THROMBOEMBOLISM

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Do not use REVLIMID during pregnancy. Lenalidomide, a thalidomide analogue, caused limb abnormalities in a developmental monkey study. Thalidomide is a known human teratogen that causes severe life-threatening human birth defects. If lenalidomide is used during pregnancy, it may cause birth defects or embryo-fetal death. In females of reproductive potential, obtain 2 negative pregnancy tests before starting REVLIMID treatment. Females of reproductive potential must use 2 forms of contraception or continuously abstain from heterosexual sex during and for 4 weeks after REVLIMID treatment. To avoid embryo-fetal exposure to lenalidomide, REVLIMID is only available through a restricted distribution program, the REVLIMID REMS program.

Information about the REVLIMID REMS program is available at http://www.celgeneriskmanagement.com or by calling the manufacturers toll-free number 1-888-423-5436.

Hematologic Toxicity (Neutropenia and Thrombocytopenia)

REVLIMID can cause significant neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Eighty percent of patients with del 5q MDS had to have a dose delay/reduction during the major study. Thirty-four percent of patients had to have a second dose delay/reduction. Grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicity was seen in 80% of patients enrolled in the study. Patients on therapy for del 5q MDS should have their complete blood counts monitored weekly for the first 8 weeks of therapy and at least monthly thereafter. Patients may require dose interruption and/or reduction. Patients may require use of blood product support and/or growth factors.

Venous and Arterial Thromboembolism

REVLIMID has demonstrated a significantly increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), as well as risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with MM who were treated with REVLIMID and dexamethasone therapy. Monitor for and advise patients about signs and symptoms of thromboembolism. Advise patients to seek immediate medical care if they develop symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, or arm or leg swelling. Thromboprophylaxis is recommended and the choice of regimen should be based on an assessment of the patients underlying risks.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Pregnancy: REVLIMID can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant female and is contraindicated in females who are pregnant. If this drug is used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential risk to the fetus.

Severe Hypersensitivity Reactions: REVLIMID is contraindicated in patients who have demonstrated severe hypersensitivity (e.g., angioedema, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis) to lenalidomide.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: See Boxed WARNINGS.

REVLIMID REMS Program: See Boxed WARNINGS. Prescribers and pharmacies must be certified with the REVLIMID REMS program by enrolling and complying with the REMS requirements; pharmacies must only dispense to patients who are authorized to receive REVLIMID. Patients must sign a Patient-Physician Agreement Form and comply with REMS requirements; female patients of reproductive potential who are not pregnant must comply with the pregnancy testing and contraception requirements and males must comply with contraception requirements.

Hematologic Toxicity: REVLIMID can cause significant neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Monitor patients with neutropenia for signs of infection. Advise patients to observe for bleeding or bruising, especially with use of concomitant medications that may increase risk of bleeding. Patients may require a dose interruption and/or dose reduction. MM: Monitor complete blood counts (CBC) in patients taking REVLIMID + dexamethasone or REVLIMID as maintenance therapy, every 7 days for the first 2 cycles, on days 1 and 15 of cycle 3, and every 28 days thereafter. MDS: Monitor CBC in patients on therapy for del 5q MDS, weekly for the first 8 weeks of therapy and at least monthly thereafter. See Boxed WARNINGS for further information. MCL: Monitor CBC in patients taking REVLIMID for MCL weekly for the first cycle (28 days), every 2 weeks during cycles 2-4, and then monthly thereafter. FL/MZL: Monitor CBC in patients taking REVLIMID for FL or MZL weekly for the first 3 weeks of Cycle 1 (28 days), every 2 weeks during Cycles 2-4, and then monthly thereafter.

Venous and Arterial Thromboembolism: See Boxed WARNINGS. Venous thromboembolic events (DVT and PE) and arterial thromboses (MI and CVA) are increased in patients treated with REVLIMID. Patients with known risk factors, including prior thrombosis, may be at greater risk and actions should be taken to try to minimize all modifiable factors (e.g., hyperlipidemia, hypertension, smoking). Thromboprophylaxis is recommended and the regimen should be based on the patients underlying risks. ESAs and estrogens may further increase the risk of thrombosis and their use should be based on a benefit-risk decision.

Increased Mortality in Patients With CLL: In a clinical trial in the first-line treatment of patients with CLL, single-agent REVLIMID therapy increased the risk of death as compared to single-agent chlorambucil. Serious adverse cardiovascular reactions, including atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, and cardiac failure, occurred more frequently in the REVLIMID arm. REVLIMID is not indicated and not recommended for use in CLL outside of controlled clinical trials.

Second Primary Malignancies (SPM): In clinical trials in patients with MM receiving REVLIMID and in patients with FL or MZL receiving REVLIMID + rituximab therapy, an increase of hematologic plus solid tumor SPM, notably AML, have been observed. In patients with MM, MDS was also observed. Monitor patients for the development of SPM. Take into account both the potential benefit of REVLIMID and risk of SPM when considering treatment.

Increased Mortality With Pembrolizumab: In clinical trials in patients with MM, the addition of pembrolizumab to a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone resulted in increased mortality. Treatment of patients with MM with a PD-1 or PD-L1 blocking antibody in combination with a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone is not recommended outside of controlled clinical trials.

Hepatotoxicity: Hepatic failure, including fatal cases, has occurred in patients treated with REVLIMID + dexamethasone. Pre-existing viral liver disease, elevated baseline liver enzymes, and concomitant medications may be risk factors. Monitor liver enzymes periodically. Stop REVLIMID upon elevation of liver enzymes. After return to baseline values, treatment at a lower dose may be considered.

Severe Cutaneous Reactions: Severe cutaneous reactions including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) have been reported. These events can be fatal. Patients with a prior history of Grade 4 rash associated with thalidomide treatment should not receive REVLIMID. Consider REVLIMID interruption or discontinuation for Grade 2-3 skin rash. Permanently discontinue REVLIMID for Grade 4 rash, exfoliative or bullous rash, or for other severe cutaneous reactions such as SJS, TEN, or DRESS.

Tumor Lysis Syndrome (TLS): Fatal instances of TLS have been reported during treatment with REVLIMID. The patients at risk of TLS are those with high tumor burden prior to treatment. Closely monitor patients at risk and take appropriate preventive approaches.

Tumor Flare Reaction (TFR): TFR has occurred during investigational use of REVLIMID for CLL and lymphoma. Monitoring and evaluation for TFR is recommended in patients with MCL, FL, or MZL. Tumor flare may mimic the progression of disease (PD). In patients with Grade 3 or 4 TFR, it is recommended to withhold treatment with REVLIMID until TFR resolves to Grade 1. REVLIMID may be continued in patients with Grade 1 and 2 TFR without interruption or modification, at the physicians discretion.

Impaired Stem Cell Mobilization: A decrease in the number of CD34+ cells collected after treatment (>4 cycles) with REVLIMID has been reported. Consider early referral to transplant center to optimize timing of the stem cell collection.

Thyroid Disorders: Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism have been reported. Measure thyroid function before starting REVLIMID treatment and during therapy.

Early Mortality in Patients With MCL: In another MCL study, there was an increase in early deaths (within 20 weeks); 12.9% in the REVLIMID arm versus 7.1% in the control arm. Risk factors for early deaths include high tumor burden, MIPI score at diagnosis, and high WBC at baseline (10 x 109/L).

Hypersensitivity: Hypersensitivity, including angioedema, anaphylaxis, and anaphylactic reactions to REVLIMID has been reported. Permanently discontinue REVLIMID for angioedema and anaphylaxis.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Multiple Myeloma

Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Follicular Lymphoma/Marginal Zone Lymphoma

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Periodically monitor digoxin plasma levels due to increased Cmax and AUC with concomitant REVLIMID therapy. Patients taking concomitant therapies such as erythropoietin-stimulating agents or estrogen-containing therapies may have an increased risk of thrombosis. It is not known whether there is an interaction between dexamethasone and warfarin. Close monitoring of PT and INR is recommended in patients with MM taking concomitant warfarin.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS, for REVLIMID.

Please see the rituximab full Prescribing Information for Important Safety Information at http://www.rituxan.com.

About BeiGene

BeiGene is a global, commercial-stage, research-based biotechnology company focused on molecularly-targeted and immuno-oncology cancer therapeutics. With a team of over 3,000 employees in the United States, China, Australia, and Europe; BeiGene is advancing a pipeline consisting of novel oral small molecules and monoclonal antibodies for cancer. BeiGene is also working to create combination solutions aimed to have both a meaningful and lasting impact on cancer patients. In the United States, BeiGene markets and distributes BRUKINSA (zanubrutinib) and in China, the Company markets ABRAXANE (paclitaxel for injection [albumin bound]), REVLIMID (lenalidomide), and VIDAZA (azacitidine) under a license from Celgene Logistics Sarl, a Bristol-Myers Squibb company.5

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other federal securities laws, including statements regarding BeiGenes plans and expectations for further development and commercialization of REVLIMID in China and the potential implications for patients. Actual results may differ materially from those indicated in the forward-looking statements as a result of various important factors, including BeiGene's ability to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of its drug candidates; the clinical results for its drug candidates, which may not support further development or marketing approval; actions of regulatory agencies, which may affect the initiation, timing and progress of clinical trials and marketing approval; BeiGene's ability to achieve commercial success for its marketed products and drug candidates, if approved; BeiGene's ability to obtain and maintain protection of intellectual property for its technology and drugs; BeiGene's reliance on third parties to conduct drug development, manufacturing and other services; BeiGenes limited operating history and BeiGene's ability to obtain additional funding for operations and to complete the development and commercialization of its drug candidates, as well as those risks more fully discussed in the section entitled Risk Factors in BeiGenes most recent quarterly report on Form 10-Q, as well as discussions of potential risks, uncertainties, and other important factors in BeiGene's subsequent filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. All information in this press release is as of the date of this press release, and BeiGene undertakes no duty to update such information unless required by law.

______________________1 Bello C, Zhang L, Naghashpour M. Follicular lymphoma: current management and future directions. Cancer Control. 2012;19:187-95.

2 Sousou T, Friedberg J. Rituximab in indolent lymphomas. Semin Hematol. 2010; 47(2):133-42.

3 Zinzani, P. L. (2012). The many faces of marginal zone lymphoma. Hematology, 2012(1), 426432.

4 https://gco.iarc.fr/

5 ABRAXANEis registered trademark ofAbraxis Bioscience LLC, aBristol-Myers Squibb company; REVLIMIDand VIDAZAare registered trademarks ofCelgene Corporation, aBristol-Myers Squibbcompany.

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BeiGene Announces Acceptance of a Supplemental New Drug Application in China for REVLIMID in Relapsed or Refractory Indolent Lymphoma - GlobeNewswire

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Human fat cells tweaked to work like heart’s pacemaker: Study – ETHealthworld.com

By daniellenierenberg

Houston: In a first, researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have reprogrammed the human body's fat cells into those similar to the heart's pacemaker cells which control heartbeat by creating rhythmic electrical impulses , an advance that may lead to new therapies for cardiac failure.

The study, published in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, noted that the new pacemaker-like cell may become a useful alternative treatment for heart conduction system disorders, and to bridge the limitations of current treatments such as artificial electronic pacemaker implants.

According to an earlier study, published in the Journal of Geriatric Cardiology, each year more than one million artificial pacemakers are implanted in patients globally.

The device is placed in the chest or abdomen, and uses electrical pulses to prompt the heart to beat normally.

In the current study, researchers, including Suchi Raghunathan from the University of Houston in the US, tweaked unspecialised stem cells to turn them into conducting cells of the heart that could carry electrical current.

The researchers, in an earlier study, had turned the stem cells residing in the human body's fat cells into cardiac progenitor cells.

With the current study, they showed that these cardiac progenitor cells can be programmed to conduct current and keep hearts beating.

They said, its functioning is similar to the heart's natural node of cells called the sinoatrial node (SAN) -- part of the electrical cardiac conduction system (CCS).

The scientists noted that the SAN is the primary pacemaker of the heart, responsible for generating the electric impulse or its 'beat'.

According to the study, the heart's native cardiac pacemaker cells are confined within the SAN -- a small structure comprised of just a few thousand specialized pacemaker cells.

It noted that a failure of the SAN, or a block at any point in the CCS resulted in irregular heartbeats, also called arrhythmias.

"Batteries will die. Just look at your smartphone. This biologic pacemaker is better able to adapt to the body and would not have to be maintained by a physician. It is not a foreign object," said study co-author Bradley McConnell from the University of Houston.

He said the cells would be able to grow with the body, and become much more responsive to what the body is doing.

As part of the study, the scientists infused lab-grown fat cells from the heart with a unique cocktail of three molecules called transcription factors that could induce gene activity.

They also supplied these cells with molecules called plasma membrane channel proteins, which are gates opening up in cells to allow outside chemicals.

Using these molecules, the team could reprogram the heart cells in vitro.

"In our study, we observed that the SHOX2, HCN2, and TBX5 (SHT5) cocktail of transcription factors and channel protein reprogrammed the cells into pacemaker-like cells," McConnell said.

The researchers said the combination of these biomolecules may facilitate the development of cell-based therapies for various cardiac conduction diseases.

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Human fat cells tweaked to work like heart's pacemaker: Study - ETHealthworld.com

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categoriaCardiac Stem Cells commentoComments Off on Human fat cells tweaked to work like heart’s pacemaker: Study – ETHealthworld.com | dataDecember 20th, 2019
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