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Bride Saves The Life Of Her Fianc Who Had Only 60 Days To Live By Finding A Stem Cell Donor

By Sykes24Tracey

Mike Brandon was given just 60 days to find a bone marrow transplant. If he didn't, his leukaemia - cancer of white blood cells - was going to overwhelm his body.

Most people faced with such odds may have given up, but Brandon's fiance, Kate Robertson launched a desperate bid to find a matching donor for her husband-to-be.

The odds paid off: less than a month after Miss Robertson's campaign was launched, a donor has been found.

Anthony Nolan said that her efforts has led to a 650% increase in people joining the bone marrow register. The blood cancer charity said that there was a particular surge among potential donors in the couple's home city of Bristol.

Miss Robertson, 31, said the response has been "astounding".

"It's been an incredibly difficult time so the relief we're feeling is overwhelming," she said.

"A matching donor means that we can go ahead with Mike's bone marrow transplant. We know we have a rocky road ahead as a transplant is a serious procedure, but knowing there is a good match for Mike is a fantastic boost that we desperately needed.

"We are hugely grateful to the selfless person who has stepped forward to help Mike, and to everyone who has pledged to do the same for someone else, by joining the Anthony Nolan register."

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After cancer rebound, Victoria's little Hannah Day back into life of pain as transplanted stem cells attack her body

By raymumme

The seemingly miraculous recovery of little Hannah Day who rebounded earlier this month after a rare bone marrow transplant cancer free for 60 days has suffered a major setback.

Mother Brooke Ervin said her stem cells, which were transplanted into her daughter on March 19, are attacking her four-year-old daughters body from the inside out, manifesting in a rash and third-degree-like burns.

She has burns to 90 per cent of her body and is now admitted back to [B.C. Childrens] hospital in hopes they can stop it.

Hannah is in immeasurable pain as her family watches, terrified and helpless, Ervin said Wednesday.

Hannah is not responding to oral antibiotics, and steroids being pumped into her body to stop the burning are suppressing her immune system, which is needed to fight off the cancer.

This is such a horrible life she got, a distraught Ervin said.

She has spent most of her life suffering just to stay alive. No one should have to fight so hard, especially an innocent child.

She wants to live so bad and she shows us every day with her fight and will to live, Ervin said. She wont give up and we cant either. We have to hold strong in the hopes one day this will end.

On May 6, Hannah was discharged from hospital in Vancouver after receiving stem cells from her mother in a haploidentical transplant.

Although only a half match, doctors hope Hannahs cells will recognize her moms cells which once protected her in the womb and allow them to kill off cancer cells in Hannahs body.

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Stem Cells Market By Application (Regenerative Medicine), By Technology (Acquisition, Sub-Culture), By Product (Adult …

By Dr. Matthew Watson

San Francisco, California (PRWEB) May 22, 2014

The global market for stem cells is expected to reach USD 170.15 billion by 2020, according to a new study by Grand View Research, Inc. Growing prevalence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular and liver disease, diabetes and cancer coupled with the presence of high unmet medical needs in these disease segments is expected to drive market growth during the forecast period. Moreover, increasing government support pertaining to funding R&D initiatives and the growing demand for medical tourism and stem cell banking services is expected to boost the demand for stem cells over the next six years. The future of this market is expected to be driven by opportunities such as the growing global prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases, increasing demand for contract research outsourcing services and the substitution of animal tissues by stem cells in the

The stem cells technology market was valued at USD 12.88 billion in 2013 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of over 12.0% during the forecast period. This market was dominated by the cell acquisitions technology segment in terms of share in 2013 owing to the fact that this technology serves as the foremost step to process involving stem cells culture. The global stem cell acquisition technology market is expected to reach USD 10.88 billion by 2020, growing at a CAGR of over 14.0% over the next six years.

The report Stem Cells Market Analysis By Product (Adult Stem Cells, Human Embryonic Cells, Pluripotent Stem Cells), By Application (Regenerative Medicine, Drug Discovery and Development) And Segment Forecasts To 2020, is available now to Grand View Research customers at http://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/stem-cells-market

Request Free Sample of this Report @ http://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/stem-cells-market/request

Further key findings from the study suggest:

Browse All Biotechnology Market Reports @ http://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry/biotechnology

For the purpose of this study, Grand View Research has segmented the global stem cells market on the basis of product, application, technology and region:

Latest Reports Published By Grand View Research:

Global Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) Market Expected to Reach USD 10.87 Billion by 2020 (https://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/polymethyl-methacrylate-pmma-industry)

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Patient receives 3D printed titanium hip

By NEVAGiles23

19 May 2014

Hip surgery conducted with a 3D printed titanium implant and bone stem cell graft has been conducted in Southampton.

The 3D printed hip was designed using the patients CT scan and CAD CAM file, thereby matching the patients exact specifications and measurements.

According to Southampton University, the implant will provide a new socket for the ball of the femur bone to enter. Doctors have also inserted a graft containing bone stem cells behind the implant and between the pelvis .

The graft is said to acts as a filler for the loss of bone, with the patients own bone marrow cells added to the graft to provide a source of bone stem cells to encourage bone regeneration behind and around the implant.

The benefits to the patient through this pioneering procedure are numerous, said Douglas Dunlop, consultant orthopaedic surgeon who conducted the operation at Southampton General Hospital. The titanium used to make the hip is more durable and has been printed to match the patients exact measurements this should improve fit and could recue the risk of having to have another surgery. The bone graft material that has been used has excellent biocompatibility and strength and will fill the defect behind the bone well, fusing it all together.

Over the past decade Dunlop and Prof Richard Oreffo, at Southampton University, have developed a translational research programme to drive bone formation using patient skeletal stem cells in orthopaedics.

The graft used in the operation is made up of a bone scaffold that allows blood to flow through it. Stem cells from the bone marrow will attach to the material and grow new bone, which will support the 3D printed hip implant.

In a statement, Prof Oreffo said: The 3D printing of the implant in titanium, from CT scans of the patient and stem cell graft is cutting edge and offers the possibility of improved outcomes for patients.

Fractures and bone loss due to trauma or disease are a significant clinical and socioeconomic problem. Growing bone at the point of injury alongside a hip implant that has been designed to the exact fit of the patient is exciting and offers real opportunities for improved recovery and quality of life.

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Herpes-loaded stem cells help kill brain tumor in mice

By Sykes24Tracey

Home > News > health-news

Washington, May 18 : Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have found a potential solution for how to more effectively kill tumor cells using cancer-killing viruses.

The investigators report that trapping virus-loaded stem cells in a gel and applying them to tumors significantly improved survival in mice with glioblastoma multiforme, the most common brain tumor in human adults and also the most difficult to treat.

The work was led by Khalid Shah, MS, PhD, an HSCI Principal Faculty member. Shah heads the Molecular Neurotherapy and Imaging Laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Cancer-killing or oncolytic viruses have been used in numerous phase 1 and 2 clinical trials for brain tumors but with limited success. In preclinical studies, oncolytic herpes simplex viruses seemed especially promising, as they naturally infect dividing brain cells.

However, the therapy hasn't translated as well for human patients. The problem previous researchers couldn't overcome was how to keep the herpes viruses at the tumor site long enough to work.

Shah and his team turned to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-a type of stem cell that gives rise to bone marrow tissue-which have been very attractive drug delivery vehicles because they trigger a minimal immune response and can be utilized to carry oncolytic viruses.

Shah and his team loaded the herpes virus into human MSCs and injected the cells into glioblastoma tumors developed in mice.

Using multiple imaging markers, it was possible to watch the virus as it passed from the stem cells to the first layer of brain tumor cells and subsequently into all of the tumor cells.

Using imaging proteins to watch in real time how the virus combated the cancer, Shah's team noticed that the gel kept the stem cells alive longer, which allowed the virus to replicate and kill any residual cancer cells that were not cut out during the debulking surgery. This translated into a higher survival rate for mice that received the gel-encapsulated stem cells.

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Homeland star David Harewood on donating bone marrow: 'They needed my stem cells urgently – it was horrifying'

By daniellenierenberg

On his journey from Birmingham boy to Hollywood star David Harewood has shared the silver screen with Leonardo Di Caprio and earned an MBE for services to drama.

But the Homeland actor says his finest moment came away from the cameras and the red carpet.

Seven years ago David received a telephone call from the Anthony Nolan Trust. Someone somewhere had the blood cancer leukaemia and was in desperate need of a bone marrow transplant to help them beat the disease.

David was the closest match.

David, 48, says: The call came completely out of the blue, I felt like I had won the lottery. It was like a giant finger in the sky pointing me out and saying, its you. I immediately wanted to do whatever I could to help.

The transplant was initially scheduled for a few months later, but those plans had to be hastily revised while RADA-trained actor David was in Romania filming The Last Enemy for BBC One.

I had another call to say my recipient had taken a turn for the worse, says David, who is best known for playing CIA counter-terrorism chief David Este in the hit US spy drama Homeland.

They couldnt wait until I finished filming as they might not make it. They needed my stem cells urgently, it was horrifying.

Thankfully David was due a break in filming, which he used to flew straight home to the UK. A nurse then visited him at home every morning for four days, giving him injections to boost his stem cell production.

On the fifth day David went to Harley Street in London to have his stem cells harvested. He was hooked up to a machine that took blood from one arm, filtered out the vital stems cells that would replace his recipients bone marrow and fed the blood back into his body through a needle in the other arm.

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First ever hip surgery with 3D printed implant and bone stem cell graft conducted

By Sykes24Tracey

Home > News > technology-news

Washington, May 17 : Researchers have completed their first hip surgery with a 3D printed implant and bone stem cell graft.

The 3D printed hip, made from titanium, was designed using the patient's CT scan and CAD CAM (computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing) technology, meaning it was designed to the patient's exact specifications and measurements.

The implant will provide a new socket for the ball of the femur bone to enter. Behind the implant and between the pelvis, doctors have inserted a graft containing bone stem cells.

The graft acts as a filler for the loss of bone. The patient's own bone marrow cells have been added to the graft to provide a source of bone stem cells to encourage bone regeneration behind and around the implant.

Southampton doctors believe this is a game changer. Douglas Dunlop, Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, conducted the operation at Southampton General Hospital. He says: "The benefits to the patient through this pioneering procedure are numerous. The titanium used to make the hip is more durable and has been printed to match the patient's exact measurements - this should improve fit and could recue the risk of having to have another surgery.

"The bone graft material that has been used has excellent biocompatibility and strength and will fill the defect behind the bone well, fusing it all together."

--ANI (Posted on 17-05-2014)

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Ground breaking hip and stem cell surgery completed using 3D printed implant

By daniellenierenberg

Doctors and scientists in Southampton have completed their first hip surgery with a 3D printed implant and bone stem cell graft.

The 3D printed hip, made from titanium, was designed using the patient's CT scan and CAD CAM (computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing) technology, meaning it was designed to the patient's exact specifications and measurements.

The implant will provide a new socket for the ball of the femur bone to enter. Behind the implant and between the pelvis, doctors have inserted a graft containing bone stem cells.

The graft acts as a filler for the loss of bone. The patient's own bone marrow cells have been added to the graft to provide a source of bone stem cells to encourage bone regeneration behind and around the implant.

Southampton doctors believe this is a game changer. Douglas Dunlop, Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, conducted the operation at Southampton General Hospital. He says: "The benefits to the patient through this pioneering procedure are numerous. The titanium used to make the hip is more durable and has been printed to match the patient's exact measurements -- this should improve fit and could recue the risk of having to have another surgery.

"The bone graft material that has been used has excellent biocompatibility and strength and will fill the defect behind the bone well, fusing it all together."

Over the past decade Mr Dunlop and Professor Richard Oreffo, at the University of Southampton, have developed a translational research programme to drive bone formation using patient skeletal stem cells in orthopaedics.

The graft used in this operation is made up of a bone scaffold that allows blood to flow through it. Stem cells from the bone marrow will attach to the material and grow new bone. This will support the 3D printed hip implant.

Professor Oreffo comments: "The 3D printing of the implant in titanium, from CT scans of the patient and stem cell graft is cutting edge and offers the possibility of improved outcomes for patients.

"Fractures and bone loss due to trauma or disease are a significant clinical and socioeconomic problem. Growing bone at the point of injury alongside a hip implant that has been designed to the exact fit of the patient is exciting and offers real opportunities for improved recovery and quality of life."

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Dr. Broyles’ Cartilage Regeneration: Why Bone Marrow Stem Cells? – Video

By daniellenierenberg


Dr. Broyles #39; Cartilage Regeneration: Why Bone Marrow Stem Cells?
Dr. Broyles highlights the differences between Dr. Saw #39;s methods and his own, including FDA regulations in the US regarding autologous stem cells. For more i...

By: boneandjointclinicbr

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Scientists get closer to the stem cells that may drive cancers

By Sykes24Tracey

THURSDAY, May 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although the very concept of cancer stem cells has been controversial, new research provides proof that these distinct types of cells exist in humans.

Using genetic tracking, researchers found that a gene mutation tied to cancer's development can be traced back to cancer stem cells. These cells are at the root of cancer and responsible for supporting the growth and progression of the disease, the scientists report.

Cancer stem cells are able to replenish themselves and produce other types of cancer cells, just as healthy cells produce other normal cells, the study's British and European authors explained.

"It's like having dandelions in your lawn. You can pull out as many as you want, but if you don't get the roots they'll come back," study first author Dr. Petter Woll, of the MRC Weatherall Institute for Molecular Medicine at the University of Oxford, said in a university news release.

The researchers, led by a team of scientists at Oxford and the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, said their findings could have significant implications for cancer treatment. They explained that by targeting cancer stem cells, doctors could not only get rid of a patient's cancer but also prevent any remaining cancer cells from sustaining the disease.

The study, published May 15 in Cancer Cell, involved 15 patients diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a type of cancer that often develops into acute myeloid leukemia, a form of blood cancer.

The researchers examined the cancer cells in the patients' bone marrow. Four of the patients were also monitored over time. One patient was followed for two years. Two patients were followed for 30 months and another patient was monitored for 10 years.

According to the researchers, in prior studies citing the existence of cancer stem cells, the lab tests that were used to identify these cells were considered by many to be unreliable.

However, "In our studies we avoided the problem of unreliable lab tests by tracking the origin and development of cancer-driving mutations in MDS patients," explained study leader Sten Eirik Jacobsen, of Oxford's MRC Molecular Haematology Unit and the Weatherall Institute for Molecular Medicine.

According to the research, a distinct group of MDS cells had all the characteristics of cancer stem cells, and only these particular cancer cells appeared able to cause tumor spread.

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Genetic tracking identifies cancer stem cells in human patients

By LizaAVILA

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

15-May-2014

Contact: University of Oxford news.office@admin.ox.ac.uk 44-186-528-0530 University of Oxford

The gene mutations driving cancer have been tracked for the first time in patients back to a distinct set of cells at the root of cancer cancer stem cells.

The international research team, led by scientists at the University of Oxford and the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, studied a group of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes a malignant blood condition which frequently develops into acute myeloid leukaemia.

The researchers say their findings, reported in the journal Cancer Cell, offer conclusive evidence for the existence of cancer stem cells.

The concept of cancer stem cells has been a compelling but controversial idea for many years. It suggests that at the root of any cancer there is a small subset of cancer cells that are solely responsible for driving the growth and evolution of a patient's cancer. These cancer stem cells replenish themselves and produce the other types of cancer cells, as normal stem cells produce other normal tissues.

The concept is important, because it suggests that only by developing treatments that get rid of the cancer stem cells will you be able to eradicate the cancer. Likewise, if you could selectively eliminate these cancer stem cells, the other remaining cancer cells would not be able to sustain the cancer.

'It's like having dandelions in your lawn. You can pull out as many as you want, but if you don't get the roots they'll come back,' explains first author Dr Petter Woll of the MRC Weatherall Institute for Molecular Medicine at the University of Oxford.

The researchers, led by Professor Sten Eirik W Jacobsen at the MRC Molecular Haematology Unit and the Weatherall Institute for Molecular Medicine at the University of Oxford, investigated malignant cells in the bone marrow of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and followed them over time.

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Raman method analyzes live cells quickly and accurately

By NEVAGiles23

The Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology (IGB) in Stuttgart, Germany, has developed a technique to analyze living cells quickly and accurately based on Raman spectroscopy. The non-invasive optical procedure, which can identify the molecular fingerprint of different materials, has primarily been employed in quality control for medications and pharmaceutical substances.

Now biomedical researchers can also use this technology thanks to the research at IGB involving joint projects with universities, industrial partners, and the State of Baden-Wrttemberg. The tmethod is suited to investigating living cells without requiring invasive techniques or altering them with dyes.

In order to characterize stem cells or identify changes to tissues that are caused by tumors, inflammations, fungi, or bacteria, for example, it is now sufficient to determine the individual cells Raman spectrum which is a specialized energy spectrum having particular analytical capability.

Prof. Katja Schenke-Layland from IGB commented, We have developed comprehensive know-how in this area and have advanced the technology from use in pure research to industrial implementation. We can now investigate not just individual cells, but entire tissue structures and organs. Next we want to further refine the technology and develop more applications.

Cell biologists at IGB use a specially developed Raman spectroscope jointly designed and built with physicists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Physical Measurement Techniques (IPM) in Freiburg. The device is compact and can be conveniently used to investigate a wide range of scientific problems. The scientists are accumulating the spectra they have recorded into a database.

Cancer testing

Schenke-Layland added, Each cell has a unique, unmistakable Raman spectrum. Doctors can compare the sample from their patients cells with our database and complete their diagnoses more quickly. The technology is already being employed on a practical basis by industrial partners. The scientists are working at present on a rapid test for cancer diagnosis.

Doctors using mobile Raman spectroscopes during an operation could unambiguously say whether a patient has cancer or not simply by comparing the cell sample with the data base.

Conventional cancer diagnoses are still complicated and prolonged. After excising the tissue for biopsy, it first must be prepared for further analysis for example by suitably sectioning or dying it to identify biomarkers. But this always requires intervention in the specimen and manipulating it in some way, she said.

Diverse applications

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Bone Marrow Stem Cells – Dr. Steenblock- Regenerative Medicine

By NEVAGiles23

Bone Marrow Stem Cells

Dr. Steenblock performing a bone marrow stem cell treatment

The latest discovery in the world of natural medical therapies is STEM CELLS!

You have within you a powerful set of tools to repair your body and keep you healthy. The future of medicine is NOT better drugs but better use and application of your bodys own stem cells. As of now stem cell-rich tissue can be extracted from your hip with virtually no discomfort and used to help restore your body. This opens up an exciting new horizon in terms of preventing and treating disease and tackling the symptoms of aging if not aging itself. Already, patients are returning to Dr. Steenblock for additional bone marrow treatments because they are seeing that their gray or white hair is turning back to its original color. Their skin not infrequently looks younger too and they report having more energy and less arthritic aches and pains!

Over the past six years, Dr. Steenblock and his medical team have done over 2,000 bone marrow procedures with much success. Contrary to the conventional painful methods used, he and his colleagues have developed an almost painless approach to extract bone marrow and the hidden trove of stem cells contained within. Using the patients own bone marrow rather than someone elses has totally eliminated the risk of graft versus host disease and the need for toxic chemotherapy to suppress the immune system. Since Dr. Steenblock is merely transferring stem cells from a persons bones into their blood stream there is never an allergic or rejection type of reaction since these are the patients own cells. The results have at times been phenomenal especially for those under 40 and for those who are really physically fit and walk or run a lot every day. The stronger an individuals bones are the better the bone marrow stem cells are. Even children that are paralyzed and who do not put weight on their legs are generally not going to have good results unless add another facet is added to their treatment. For those people who do not walk much, are not physically fit and who are older than 40, Dr. Steenblock generally recommends that they undergo five successive daily injections of a natural bone marrow mobilizer called Neupogen (Filgrastim) beginning 19 days before they come to his office for their bone marrow treatment(s). The ideal treatment for anyone with a complicated health issue is to first have certain tests done to determine if they have any problems that could interfere with the treatments success. These tests include standard blood tests for anemia, hormones, metabolism, infections, autoimmunity, inflammation and special tests for heavy metal poisons and intestinal infections and infestations. If problems are discovered with these tests then the underlying problem should be corrected before beginning the process of using the Neupogen and the scheduling of the bone marrow treatment(s). The word marrows is pleural intentionally because a person in general has a better result if more stem cells are given. By having two bone marrow procedures on successive days an individual will double the number of stem cells they receive. For example, if a 60 year old sedentary person comes in and does only one bone marrow treatment Dr. Steenblock will generally extract about 400 milliliters of stem cell-rich bone marrow (buffy coat after centrifugation) which is put directly back into the blood stream by intravenous means. The number of active, healthy stem cells in this simple procedure may only be 100 million and these in general will not be as healthy or as active as they will be if the patient first has any known or potential impediments to their post-infusion activity eliminated and they are given the 5 daily injections of Neupogen. When a person comes to the clinic 14 days after their last Neupogen injection, that same 400 ml of bone marrow will have somewhere between 500 and 1000 million stem cells and then if they repeat the process the next day they will get another 500-1000 million stem cells. By this combination of eradicating infections, correcting other problems discovered using our testing, and then using Neupogen followed by two bone marrow treatments patients will be receiving well over a billion stem cells.

Benefits of Bone Marrow Stem Cells

What is the secret behind the successes Dr. Steenblock has seen with the bone marrow treatments? While bone marrow transplants have been done for the past 50 years for cancer patients and those with blood disorders, the whole bone marrow procedure done by Dr. Steenblock is different because it is so SIMPLE! He uses a persons own bone marrow and instead of isolating one type of stem cell, he takes and uses the whole raw bone marrow which contains a rich variety of stem and progenitor cells. In fact, bone marrow is rich in two different types of stem cells: One type turns into blood cells, blood vessels, and cells of the immune system and are called hematopoietic stem cells (heme meaning blood-related). The other type of stem cell is the support (stromal or mesenchymal) stem cell that produces bone, fat, tendons, skin, muscles and connective tissue. Recent research shows that these hematopoietic and the support stem cells are also able to divide into all types of brain cells, including glial cells (white matter) and neurons (gray matter). The bone marrow also contains retinal progenitor cells and several patients have actually commented on how their vision improved as a side benefit of their bone marrow procedure. These two type of stem cells work better together in a ratio of one hematopoietic to 4 to 8 support (stromal or mesenchymal) stem cells which is the ratio found normally in most peoples bone marrow.

In regard to its anti-aging effects, the bone marrow contains primitive progenitor cells that are associated with the early development of the fetus. These primitive cells reside dormant deep inside each of our bones and sport a virginal profile from early development in that these stem cells are generally resting and not active. This inactivity protects them from chemicals or stresses that induce mutations such as occurs in those bone marrow stem cells that are located in the more superficial areas of the bone which are constantly making red and white blood cells. When these primitive, more pure cells are released into a persons system, there can be a revitalization of the body that physiologically sets the clock back in-a-way since these stem cells get into all parts of the body and produce more growth factors than would otherwise be possible. It is this increase in growth factors that induces the regenerative processes. For those that can afford it Dr. Steenblock uses growth factors oriented toward improving the organs that are diseased. For example, if a patients chief problem is their lungs then he may suggest some lung growth factors to be taken right along with the Neupogen and then continued for 6 weeks to help push the stem cells into becoming more like lung tissue cells.

Bottom line: Bone marrow stem cells have the potential to repair damaged tissues and organs. Whether a person wants an anti-aging treatment or needs the procedure to repair damage in joints, liver, kidneys, heart or brain, bone marrow transplants is an efficient and sure way to flood their body with stem cells.

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Stem Cells to The Rescue: Repairing The Hearts

By Dr. Matthew Watson

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) --

"Grace is what's carried me through this," Minch told Ivanhoe.

Ten years ago, at just 49, the choir singer and her husband were told she would need a quadruple bypass.

"Now we are at the point where my heart is severely damaged and nothing is really helping," Minch said.

Doctors said a heart transplant was her only option, but she'll soon find out if she'll be accepted into a new trial that could use her own stem cells to help repair the once thought irreversible damage, "or even create new blood vessels within areas of the heart that have been damaged," Jon George, MD, Interventional Cardiologist, Temple University School of Medicine, told Ivanhoe.

First, stem cells are taken from a patient's bone marrow. Then using a special catheter and 3D mapping tool, the cells are injected directly into the damaged tissue.

"We have results from animal data that show blood vessels regrow in the patients that actually get stem cell therapy," Dr. George said.

It's a possible answer to Debbie's prayers.

Temple University Hospital is currently pre-screening patients for the trial. For more information, call 215-707-5340.

------

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STEMCELL Technologies Inc. Launches Novel Cell Culture Medium to Advance Research on Mouse Mesenchymal Stem and …

By Sykes24Tracey

Vancouver, British Columbia (PRWEB) May 12, 2014

STEMCELL Technologies Inc. has just released NEW MesenCult Proliferation Kit with MesenPure (Mouse), a novel cell culture medium to advance research on mouse mesenchymal stem and progenitor cells (MSCs).

When added to MesenCult medium, MesenPure supplement enriches mouse bone marrow- or compact bone-derived MSC cultures by reducing the number of hematopoietic cells. Culturing with MesenPure eliminates the time-intensive serial passaging steps and frequent cell culture medium changes normally required to decrease the unwanted hematopoietic cell population typically present in MSC cultures. Cultures treated with MesenPure appear homogeneous and mostly devoid of hematopoietic cells as early as passage zero and also contain increased numbers of mesenchymal stem cells that display more robust differentiation.

This easy-to-use and versatile kit, may save researchers from having to wait several weeks for homogeneous MSC cultures, explains Dr. Arthur Sampaio, Senior Scientist at STEMCELL Technologies. But, I think the greatest advantage to using MesenPure may be the ability to use lower-passage cultures. It has been shown that over time, extended passaging can bring about detrimental changes to MSCs, such as a loss of phenotype, senescence, and a decrease in the homing ability and differentiation potential of the cells. By using the MesenCult Proliferation Kit with MesenPure, researchers will be able to study lower passage mouse MSCs, increasing their ability to evaluate the true potential of these cells.

For more information or to request a free sample, please visit http://www.stemcell.com/freemesenpure.

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STEMCELL Technologies Inc. Launches Novel Cell Culture Medium to Advance Research on Mouse Mesenchymal Stem and ...

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Stem cell treatments reaching patients

By LizaAVILA

Neurosurgeon and stem cell researcher, Joseph Ciacci M.D. will soon start a clinical trial of stem cells to treat paralysis from spinal cord injury.

After many years of waiting, a flood of new regenerative-cell therapies is finally reaching patients. Hundreds of clinical trials for these experimental treatments are under way across the world.

In the United States, 774 trials with stem or other regenerative cells are open to patients or soon will be, according to clinicaltrials.gov, which lists government-approved clinical testing in this country and abroad. Of that total, 147 are taking place in California.

One of the most difficult tests involving stem cells repairing spinal-cord damage that has caused complete loss of movement and sensation below the injury site is set to begin soon at UC San Diego.

Patients in that study will get injections of fetal-derived neural stem cells in and around the injury site, along with physical therapy and immune-system drugs in case theres a reaction to the stem cells. The trial will use a device that delivers precisely targeted micro-injections of cells to the targeted areas.

The clinical trial will test safety and look for early signs of efficacy, said Dr. Joseph Ciacci, a UC San Diego neurosurgeon leading the testing.

A study published a year ago found that in rats with spinal-cord injuries, the neural stem cells significantly improved movement in the hind paws. Ciacci, who co-authored that study, saw the cells proliferate and fill in a spinal-cord cavity that had resulted from the injuries. Such results supported testing the therapy in people, he said, but he declined to say whether he expected to see any improvement in those patients.

I really dont know, because its not been done, Ciacci said.

The clinical trial is expected to start in June. Its intended for adults 18 to 65 years old who suffered their injury at least one year ago but no more than two years ago. For more information, visit utsandiego.com/ucsdspinal or call Amber Faulise at (858) 657-5175.

Another type of stem cells, mesenchymal stromal, might be described as the duct tape of regenerative cells. Generally derived from bone marrow, they are being tested for treatment of pulmonary fibrosis, multiple sclerosis, kidney transplants, liver cirrhosis, osteoarthritis of the knee, stroke and many other conditions. Worldwide, 226 trials are being conducted with these cells, including 45 in the U.S. and 12 in California, according to clinicaltrials.gov.

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Stem cell treatments reaching patients

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What Are Bone Marrow Stem Cells? (with pictures)

By LizaAVILA

Bone marrow stem cells are special cells within the bone marrow that can form into any type of blood cell when triggered. This allows the bone marrow to supply blood cells to the body as they are needed. The bone marrow acts as a sort of factory or manufacturing station for blood cells, using these undifferentiated stem cells as raw material for white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.

Doctors and scientists have known that bone marrow stem cells can grow into any type of blood cell. Research has shown, however, that these cells also can develop into other types of cells such as cardiac cells, skin cells, and even muscle cells. This research indicates that bone marrow stem cells might be able to be used to treat a number of diseases that are not necessarily related to blood.

Bone marrow stem cells are used to treat several blood-based diseases. Perhaps the best known of these treatments is the bone marrow transplant, commonly used to treat leukemia and lymphoma. In these forms of cancer, intense radiation therapy or chemotherapy destroys the bone marrow cells, which in this case have begun to malfunction. The malfunctioning bone marrow is then replaced with cells from a bone marrow donor. In some cases, a patient may donate blood cells but the cells must be cancer-free for the treatment to be effective; this process is referred to as autologous bone marrow.

For a bone marrow donation to be effective, the blood type of the donor and other factors typically must be evaluated and matched to that of the patient. The more similar characteristics that exist between patient and donor, the more likely the transplant is to be successful. Because of this, close relatives of the patient are more likely to be able to provide a compatible donation. Donations also can come from non-related people, as well.

It is possible to be tested for these important factors ahead of time and be placed on a list of possible donors. In cases where bone marrow stem cells are needed for a transplant, individuals on the list will be evaluated to look for a match with the patient. Like blood banks, bone marrow donations lists are a vital tool to help those afflicted with certain types of devastating diseases. As scientific research continues, more uses for bone marrow stem cells are likely to surface, some of which could revolutionize modern medicine.

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What Are Bone Marrow Stem Cells? (with pictures)

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Will bone marrow stem cells help heart attack patients …

By Sykes24Tracey

> My last post introduced the large-scale publicly funded clinical trial called BAMI (the effect of intracoronary reinfusion of Bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells on all course mortality in Acute Myocardial Infarction). That post focused on the role of the public purse in funding such trials and concluded that public monies have a major role to play in what companies would consider not fundable.

Since clinical trials are enormously expensive, however, it makes the choice of trial to run/fund incredibly difficult and important. The BAMI trial proposes to take whole bone marrow cells from patients who have had a heart attack and transplant them into the hearts of the patients with the hope that these cells will prevent people from re-hospitalization and/or death. Interestingly, the BAMI trial is billed as a stem cell therapy, when in reality it is a hodge-podge of un-fractionated cells that are injected into the heart. Cell therapy, yes. Stem cells, maybe not

When we hear about stem cell trials, we often think of permanent cures where the stem cell population(s) replaces damaged stem cells and operates as normal (e.g., as in the case of successful bone marrow transplantations where donor cells repopulate the recipient forever). I dont think it is likely that the cells in the BAMI trial will be setting up shop in the hearts of patients but one never knows and it would be very interesting to see if cells are still present at the two year endpoint. Present or not, if these cell suspensions achieve the 25% reduction in mortality and 15% reduction in re-hospitalization, then it may be worth it despite the lack of permanence.

Even for someone who has trained in the stem cells and regenerative medicine field for 10 years now, it is difficult to imagine how this (stem) cell therapy might work and what the underlying mechanism of action would be. If anything, I think the benefit would come from the other bone marrow cells injected (the non-stem cells) as a sort of directed delivery of key regenerative molecules or cells (e.g., cytokines, immune cells). These molecules may support tissue healing, they may prevent further damage, they may inhibit scarring, but realistically, we simply do not know what they will do and its a bit of a cowboy experiment when the data from previous trials are not exactly a ringing endorsement of promised success.

The only trial I could find, that had any indication of modest effects, was the TAC-HFTtrial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00768066) showing that the 1-year incidence of serious adverse events was 31.6% for mesenchymal stem cells, 31.6% for bone marrow cells, and 38.1% for placebo controls. This is a marginal decrease in adverse effects, and the trial only enrolled 65 patients.

On the other hand, the majority of completed studies lack strong positive data (as was also highlighted this Nature News article last week) including:

Despite these suggestions that this therapy will not benefit patients, the really good news is that the BAMI trial is well-designed, has clear and defined endpoints that are easy to assess (mortality and re-hospitalization) and is unlikely to be damaging to patients since they are receiving their own cells. Moreover, the trial at its conclusion will have developed several protocols that will be useful to the wider community considering future cell therapies. These include standardized methods for bone marrow cell collection and preparation for autologous transplantation into the heart.

Most importantly, the trial is very large (3000 patients) and statistically well-powered meaning that it should really put the question as to whether there is any benefit to the test. A few years from now, we should have a good sense of whether there is something interesting happening and maybe then scientists might invest some energy into figuring out how and why it might work.

David Kent holds a PhD in Genetics (UBC) and a BSc in Genetics and English (UWO) and is currently a CIHR postdoctoral fellow at the University of Cambridge, UK. He studies normal and malignant stem cell biology and currently sits on the executive for the Canadian Association of Postdoctoral Scholars. He also maintains his own blog for early career researchers at University Affairs, called the Black Hole (http://www.universityaffairs.ca/the-black-hole/).

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Study urges caution in stem cell clinical trials for heart attack patients

By Dr. Matthew Watson

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

7-May-2014

Contact: Nick Miller nicholas.miller@cchmc.org 513-803-6035 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

CINCINNATI A new study in Nature challenges research data that form the scientific basis of clinical trials in which heart attack patients are injected with stem cells to try and regenerate damaged heart tissue.

Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), report May 7 that cardiac stem cells used in ongoing clinical trials which express a protein marker called c-kit do not regenerate contractile heart muscle cells at high enough rates to justify their use for treatment.

Including collaboration from researchers at Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles and the University of Minnesota's Lillehei Heart Institute, the study uncovers new evidence in what has become a contentious debate in the field of cardiac regeneration, according to Jeffery Molkentin, PhD, study principal investigator and a cardiovascular molecular biologist and HHMI investigator at the Cincinnati Children's Heart Institute.

"Our data suggest any potential benefit from injecting c-kit-positive cells into the hearts of patients is not because they generate new contractile cells called cardiomyocytes," Molkentin said. "Caution is warranted in further clinical testing of this method until the mechanisms in play here are better defined or we are able to dramatically enhance the potential of these cells to generate cardiomyocytes."

Numerous heart attack patients have already been treated with c-kit-positive stem cells that are removed from healthy regions of a damaged heart then processed in a laboratory, Molkentin explained. After processing, the cells are then injected into these patients' hearts. The experimental treatment is based largely on preclinical studies in rats and mice suggesting that c-kit-positive stem cells completely regenerate myocardial cells and heart muscle. Thousands of patients have also previously undergone a similar procedure for their hearts but with bone marrow stem cells.

Molkentin and his colleagues report those previous preclinical studies in rodents do not reflect what really occurs within the heart after injury, where internal regenerative capacity is almost non-existent. Molkentin also said that combined data from multiple clinical trials testing this type of treatment show most patients experienced a roughly 3-5 percent improvement in heart ejection fraction a measurement of how forcefully the heart pumps blood. Data in the current Nature study suggest this small benefit may come from the ability of c-kit-positive stem cells in heart to cause the growth of capillaries, which improves circulation within the organ, but not by generating new cardiomyocytes.

"What we show in our study is that c-kit-positive stem cells from the heart like to make endothelial cells that form capillaries. But in their natural environment in the heart, these c-kit positive cells do not like to make cardiomyocytes," Molkentin said. "They will produce cardiomyocytes, but at rates so low roughly one in every 3,000 cells it becomes meaningless."

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Health Beat: Growing stem cells in space: Medicine's next big thing?

By NEVAGiles23

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

Hemorrhagic stroke is responsible for more than 30 percent of all stroke deaths. It happens when a weakened blood vessel ruptures and bleeds into the brain.

Its something Jon Galvan experienced five years ago when he almost died from a hemorrhagic stroke while at work.

"I was typing away and I felt a pop in my head," Galvan said.

He was able to recover, but Dr. Abba Zubair, medical director of transfusion medicine and stem cell therapy at Mayo Clinic, Florida, said not everyone is as fortunate.

"If it happens, you either recover completely or die," Zubair said. "Thats what killed my mother."

Zubair said he wants to send bone marrow derived stem cells to the international space station.

"Based on our experience with bone marrow transplant, you need about 200 to 500 million cells," Zubair said.

But conventionally grown stem cells take a month. Experiments on earth have shown that stem cells will grow faster in less gravity.

"Five to ten times faster, but it could be more," Zubair said.

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Health Beat: Growing stem cells in space: Medicine's next big thing?

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