Vitamin B6 Cuts Colon Cancer Risk

By Dr. Matthew Watson

By Kathleen Doheny

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- High daily levels of vitamin B6 may reduce the risk of getting colon cancer by 58 percent, claims a new study from Harvard Medical School.

The research, published in the May 4 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, builds on other studies that have already indicated a strong preventive effect from the vitamin.

"There are several smaller studies that have found a protective effect from dietary intakes of B6," said lead researcher Esther K. Wei, an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital. However, "this is the first large study of women to look at blood levels of B6" and find a protective effect, she added.

Wei and her colleagues evaluated nearly 33,000 women who were participants in the Nurses' Health study, a long-running study that began in 1976. Since then, researchers have focused on subsets of the original 121,700 participants, all nurses between 30 and 55 years of age when they enrolled, to study various health issues. Read more...

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