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Becoming a bone marrow donor could save a life

By Dr. Matthew Watson

Be The Match donor registry drive in Cokato Saturday

By Kristen Miller
News Editor

COKATO, MN – By age 14, Taylor Tenhoff had already been diagnosed with severe aplastic anemia and had undergone two bone marrow transplants; one that was unsuccessful.

Fortunately for Taylor’s sake, he was able to find a match in one of his six siblings. However, there are many patients in need of bone marrow transplants who don’t have a sibling match and rely Be The Match Registry, operated by the nonprofit, National Marrow Donor Program.

In an effort to raise awareness for the need of bone marrow donors, the Tenhoff family of Cokato is hosting a Be The Match donor registry drive Saturday, Feb. 11 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the community room of Cokato City Hall. It is also the one year anniversary of Taylor’s second bone marrow transplant.

“We want to increase the amount of donors available,” Taylor’s mother, Monica, said. “The more people that get on the registry, the more potential donors there are.”

In 2008, Katie (Tenhoff) Richter donated bone marrow to her brother, only for it to fail months later. She donated again last February.

“If I had to do it again, I would,” Katie said. “The feeling you get knowing he’s alive because of you is amazing.”

Thousands of patients with life-threatening diseases and blood cancers, such as leukemia, lymphoma, and sickle cell anemia depend on the Be The Match Registry to find a bone marrow match.

According to Be The Match, 70 percent of patients needing a marrow transplant do not have a matching donor within their family.

“Siblings are the best match, but it’s not always a guarantee . . that’s when the patient comes to us,” said Kristine Reed, account executive of recruitment and development for Be The Match, the only marrow registry in the US.

Unlike blood donations, bone marrow does not match according to blood type. Instead, matches are based on the same racial and ethnic background, Reed explained.

“Not a lot of people are aware of that,” she said. “Right now, we are extremely low on the registry of non-caucasion donors,” she added.

The matching process is extremely specific, Reed said. If the recipient’s body doesn’t recognize the marrow type, it will try and fight it, a fight that could actually be fatal, she said.

There are requirements and limits for being on the registry. Donors need to be between the ages of 18 and 60, be willing to donate to any patient in need, and meet the health guidelines.

Reed, who is a leukemia survivor and marrow transplant recipient since 1999, will be leading the registry Saturday. She recommends those interested in joining the registry learn more about it beforehand.

“We want to make sure they are comfortable and willing to donate when they get the call,” Reed said. “If they get the call, it’s because they match a patient who is dying.”

It also costs the organization roughly $100 every time someone is placed on the registry, Reed said, adding that donors are encouraged to give what they can.

The registry process is painless and only takes between 20 to 30 minutes. It includes completing a confidential consent form and a cheek swab. No blood is drawn.

How the bone marrow donation process works

Once the donor has been called upon, there are two possible ways for bone marrow to be drawn.

The most common process is the peripheral blood stem cell donation. Similar to donating plasma or platelets, this is a non-surgical procedure and is requested by doctors 76 percent of the time.

For five days before donation, the donor receives daily injections of a drug that increases blood-forming cells in the bloodstream. On the last day, the donor’s blood is removed through a needle in one arm and passed through a machine that separates out the blood-forming cells. The remaining blood is returned to the donor through the other arm.

The second process is a surgical procedure of marrow donation, and it is requested by doctors 24 percent of the time.

During this procedure, the donor is under anesthesia while the doctor uses a needle to withdraw liquid marrow from the back of the pelvic bone.

Once the marrow is drawn, it is immediately transported to the intended recipient.

Half of the donors on the registry benefit patients from another country, and half of the patients that come to the registry receive a donor from another country, Reed explained. “It works both ways,” she said.

Marrow donors can expect to feel some soreness in the lower back for a few days to several weeks. Reed describes the pain similar to having fallen after slipping on ice.

Marrow donors are typically back to their unusual routine tin two to seven days. All costs are the recipient’s responsibility.

“There could be temporary discomfort,” Reed said, “but keep in mind, you’re giving someone a second chance at life.”

The temporary discomfort the donor may experience doesn’t compare to what the recipient has to go through before the transplant, Reed said, who received her sister’s bone marrow 12 years ago.

Just to put it in perspective, the patient needs full body radiation and intense chemotherapy to eradicate as much existing marrow as possible to make room for new, healthy marrow, Reed explained. “It’s like draining out a tank of gas,” she said.

Even after the transplant, there is a long road to recovery for the recipient, she commented.

To become a potential donor:

For those interested in being on the Be The Match Registry, visit http://www.tinyurl.com/TaylorTenhoff to learn more about becoming a donor.

To register, come to the donor registry drive Saturday, Feb. 11 from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. at Cokato City Hall. Baked goods will be available with a free will offering and Dairy Queen coupons will be given to anyone who donates to the cause.

If becoming a donor isn’t a possibility, there is still an opportunity to donate cash toward the cause, which will be used to help cover lab costs associated with being on the registry.

More information can be found on http://marrow.org.

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Stamford seventh-grader hosting bone marrow donor drive Super Bowl Sunday

By raymumme

STAMFORD — Justin Wexler, 12, a seventh-grader at Scofield Magnet Middle School, is asking Stamford residents to "be a super hero on Super Bowl Sunday" by registering to be a bone marrow donor.

Justin is hosting a donor drive at the Jewish Community Center, at 1035 Newfield Ave., from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday for his mitzvah project, a contribution to the community before his bar mitzvah.

"Don’t worry, there’s plenty of time to do this early in the day and get back home in time to watch the game," said Justin, who will be rooting for the Giants on Sunday.

The donor drive will take about six minutes for each participant from start to finish, he said, calmly spelling out the detailed process step-by-step as he sat at the head of his family’s dining room table Tuesday afternoon, his bright blue eyes shining.

"You walk into the JCC, and first you’ll come to a station and they’ll tell you the eligibility requirements ... then you fill out a basic registration form and go off to the swabbing station," he said. Each donor will then take a swab from the inside of their left and right cheek and wrap their samples up with their information.

"That’s it. It doesn’t take long," he said. "But think about what could come from it."

Justin came up with the idea for a bone marrow drive around Thanksgiving, as he and his mother reflected on his father’s experiences as a bone marrow donor for a woman in Long Island about two years ago. Justin’s grandfather also donated bone marrow before Justin was born. The idea that his family members were able to save others’ lives so easily stuck with him.

There are nearly 3 million potential donors registered with DKMS, the bone marrow donor center through which Justin will run his drive. But with a new diagnosis every four minutes, the donor reserves still aren’t enough; 60 percent of bone cancer patients never receive the transplants they need.

"It’s like finding a needle in a haystack," Justin said. His hope is that his drive will add 180 new names to that registry, and that someone will someday be a match for someone else in need. He chose the number 180 because it is a multiple of 18, a spiritual number in the Jewish faith that has strong ties to "life."

"It’s mitzvah, and trying to give someone else a life, so we thought 180 would be a good goal," he said. Continued...

While Justin said he is hoping to sign up scores of potential donors, he stressed that people should not register if they’re not absolutely certain they will be willing to go through with the transplant. He mentioned a boy around his age in Texas that he met around the holidays, who recently found a non-related donor for his second transplant after a transplant from his brother did not work as well as he and his doctors had anticipated.

"Imagine if they found him a match and then they said no," Justin said.

There are two ways to donate if a match is found. About 80 percent of the time, a donor’s blood is removed from one arm with a needle, blood stem cells are filtered out and the remaining blood is pumped back into the other arm. In the other method, marrow cells are collected from a donor using a special syringe.

The first option can often take two days, while the second takes about one or two hours in outpatient surgery. While flu-like side effects can occur for about 48 hours after the first option, donors usually experience some pain, bruising and stiffness for up to two weeks after the second option, according to DKMS.

"I think most people when they find out someone has cancer, they feel helpless, but this could be an opportunity to save someone’s life," said Justin’s mother, Robin Wexler.

Justin’s not old enough to swab his own cheeks for the cause — donors have to be between the ages of 18 and 55 — but he said he is glad to be helping by spreading the word.

"Maybe someone will show up on Sunday, someone who’s never even thought about doing this before, and maybe that person will be a match; maybe they’ll save a life," he said. "Imagine that."

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Stamford boy hosting bone marrow donor drive Sunday

By daniellenierenberg

STAMFORD -- Justin Wexler, 12, a seventh-grader at Scofield Magnet Middle School, is asking Stamford residents to "be a super hero on Super Bowl Sunday" by registering to be a bone marrow donor.

Justin is hosting a donor drive at the Jewish Community Center, at 1035 Newfield Ave., from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday for his mitzvah project, a contribution to the community before his bar mitzvah.

"Don't worry, there's plenty of time to do this early in the day and get back home in time to watch the game," said Justin, who will be rooting for the Giants on Sunday.

The donor drive will take about 6 minutes for each participant from start to finish, he explained, calmly spelling out the detailed process step-by-step as he sat at the head of his family's dining room table Tuesday afternoon, his bright blue eyes shining.

"You walk into the JCC, and first you'll come to a station and they'll tell you the eligibility requirements ¦ then you fill out a basic registration form and go off to the swabbing station," he said. Each donor will then take a swab from the inside of their left and right cheek and wrap their samples up with their information.

"That's it. It doesn't take long," he said. "But think about what could come from it."

Justin came up with the idea for a bone marrow drive around Thanksgiving, as he and his mother reflected on his father's experiences as a bone marrow donor for a woman in Long Island about two years ago. Justin's grandfather also donated bone marrow before Justin was born. The idea that his family members were able to save others' lives so easily stuck with him.

There are nearly 3 million potential donors registered with DKMS, the bone marrow donor center through which Justin will run his drive. But with a new diagnosis every four minutes, the donor reserves still aren't enough; 60 percent of bone cancer patients never receive the transplants they need.

"It's like finding a needle in a haystack," Justin said. His hope is that his drive will add 180 new names to that registry, and that someone will someday be a match for someone else in need. He chose the number 180 because it is a multiple of 18, a spiritual number in the Jewish faith that has strong ties to "life."

"It's mitzvah, and trying to give someone else a life, so we thought 180 would be a good goal," he said.

While Justin said he is hoping to sign up scores of potential donors, he stressed that people should not register if they're not absolutely certain they will be willing to go through with the transplant. He mentioned a boy around his age in Texas that he met around the holidays, who recently found a non-related donor for his second transplant after a transplant from his brother did not work as well as he and his doctors had anticipated.

"Imagine if they found him a match and then they said no," Justin said.

There are two ways to donate if a match is found. About 80 percent of the time, a donor's blood is removed from one arm with a needle, blood stem cells are filtered out and the remaining blood is pumped back into the other arm. In the other method, marrow cells are collected from a donor using a special syringe.

The first option can often take two days, while the second takes about one or two hours in outpatient surgery. While flu-like side effects can occur for about 48 hours after the first option, donors usually experience some pain, bruising and stiffness for up to two weeks after the second option, according to DKMS.

"I think most people when they find out someone has cancer, they feel helpless, but this could be an opportunity to save someone's life," said Justin's mother, Robin Wexler.

Justin's not old enough to swab his own cheeks for the cause -- donors have to be between the ages of 18 and 55 -- but he said he is glad to be helping by spreading the word.

"Maybe someone will show up on Sunday, someone who's never even thought about doing this before, and maybe that person will be a match; maybe they'll save a life," he said. "Imagine that."

Staff writer Maggie Gordon can be reached at maggie.gordon@scni.com or 203-964-2229.

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Police officers offer bone marrow

By NEVAGiles23

2 February 2012 Last updated at 08:31 ET

More than 100 police officers in Cornwall have signed up to become bone marrow donors.

Insp Dave Meredith, of Devon and Cornwall Police, had appealed to staff to register for the medical procedure.

So far, 110 officers in Cornwall have signed up to the register in three weeks, with a call to Devon officers due to follow.

Insp Meridith said: "I'm very impressed but I think this reflects on the goodwill of the officers and staff."

'Saving someone's life'

Insp Meredith said he decided to encourage registration after the donation method changed.

Continue reading the main story “Start Quote

The bigger the pool, the bigger the chance”

End Quote Karen Archer Anthony Nolan charity

Donors register by providing a sample of saliva, and then 80% of those asked to donate, do so by giving blood, from which their stem cells are retrieved.

Insp Meredith said: "In light of those changes I thought I've really got to take one step forward.

"People were a little apprehensive at first but once they thought about it and realised the implication and that they were potentially saving someone's life they readily agreed."

Simon Wilcock, an officer in Newquay who had Hodgkin's Lymphoma ten years ago, said: "I was on chemotherapy at the time and it had worked to a point.

"But it had got to the stage where without a transplant there's no doubt that in a few months I probably wouldn't have survived."

The appeal to the force was issued three weeks ago with the volunteers required to be aged between 18 and 40, although those on the register remain on it until they turn 60.

Karen Archer from the charity, Anthony Nolan, said: "It takes one person to save a life so if we've got 110 people joining the register then that's amazing news.

"People can be waiting years for that one right person to join the register, but there are 1000s of people waiting at any one time.

"The bigger the pool, the bigger the chance."

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Experimental Neurology Journal: BrainStorm's NurOwn™ Stem Cell Technology Shows Promise for Treating Huntington's …

By Dr. Matthew Watson

NEW YORK & PETACH TIKVAH, Israel--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc. (OTCBB: BCLI.OB - News), a leading developer of adult stem cell technologies and therapeutics, announced today that the prestigious Experimental Neurology Journal, published an article indicating that preclinical studies using cells that underwent treatment with Brainstorm’s NurOwn™ technology show promise in an animal model of Huntington’s disease. The article was published by leading scientists including Professor Melamed and Professor Offen of the Tel Aviv University.

In these studies, bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells secreting neurotrophic factors (MSC-NTF), from patients with Huntington’s disease, were transplanted into the animal model of this disease and showed therapeutic improvement.

“The findings from this study demonstrate that stem cells derived from patients with a neurodegenerative disease, which are processed using BrainStorm’s NurOwn™ technology, may alleviate neurotoxic signs, in a similar way to cells derived from healthy donors. This is an important development for the company, as it confirms that autologous transplantation may be beneficial for such additional therapeutic indications,” said Dr. Adrian Harel, BrainStorm’s CEO.

"These findings provide support once again that BrainStorm’s MSC-NTF secreting cells have the potential to become a platform that in the future will provide treatment for various neuro-degenerative diseases," says Chaim Lebovits, President of BrainStorm. "This study follows previously published pre-clinical studies that demonstrated improvement in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and neural damage such as optic nerve transection and sciatic nerve injury. Therefore, BrainStorm will consider focusing on a new indication in the near future, in addition to the ongoing Clinical Trials in ALS.”

BrainStrom is currently conducting a Phase I/II Human Clinical Trial for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease at the Hadassah Medical center. Initial results from the clinical trial (which is designed mainly to test the safety of the treatment), that were announced last week, have shown that the Brainstorm’s NurOwn™ therapy is safe and does not show any significant treatment-related adverse events and have also shown certain signs of beneficial clinical effects.

To read the Article entitled ‘Mesenchymal stem cells induced to secrete neurotrophic factors attenuate quinolinic acid toxicity: A potential therapy for Huntington's disease’ by Sadan et al. please go to:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014488612000295

About BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics, Inc.

BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc. is a biotech company developing adult stem cell therapeutic products, derived from autologous (self) bone marrow cells, for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The company, through its wholly owned subsidiary Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics Ltd., holds rights to develop and commercialize the technology through an exclusive, worldwide licensing agreement with Ramot at Tel Aviv University Ltd., the technology transfer company of Tel-Aviv University. The technology is currently in a Phase I/II clinical trials for ALS in Israel.

Safe Harbor Statement

Statements in this announcement other than historical data and information constitute "forward-looking statements" and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc.'s actual results to differ materially from those stated or implied by such forward-looking statements, including, inter alia, regarding safety and efficacy in its human clinical trials and thereafter; the Company's ability to progress any product candidates in pre-clinical or clinical trials; the scope, rate and progress of its pre-clinical trials and other research and development activities; the scope, rate and progress of clinical trials we commence; clinical trial results; safety and efficacy of the product even if the data from pre-clinical or clinical trials is positive; uncertainties relating to clinical trials; risks relating to the commercialization, if any, of our proposed product candidates; dependence on the efforts of third parties; failure by us to secure and maintain relationships with collaborators; dependence on intellectual property; competition for clinical resources and patient enrollment from drug candidates in development by other companies with greater resources and visibility, and risks that we may lack the financial resources and access to capital to fund our operations. The potential risks and uncertainties include risks associated with BrainStorm's limited operating history, history of losses; minimal working capital, dependence on its license to Ramot's technology; ability to adequately protect its technology; dependence on key executives and on its scientific consultants; ability to obtain required regulatory approvals; and other factors detailed in BrainStorm's annual report on Form 10-K and quarterly reports on Form 10-Q available at http://www.sec.gov. The Company does not undertake any obligation to update forward-looking statements made by us.

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Stem cell therapy shows promise for stroke

By Dr. Matthew Watson

By Maureen Salamon
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Treating stroke patients with stem cells taken from their own bone marrow appears to safely help them regain some of their lost abilities, two small new studies suggest.

Indian researchers observed mixed results in the extent of stroke patients' improvements, with one study showing marked gains in daily activities, such as feeding, dressing and movement, and the other study noting these improvements to be statistically insignificant. But patients seemed to safely tolerate the treatments in both experiments with no ill effects, study authors said.

"The results are encouraging to know but we need a larger, randomized study for more definitive conclusions," said Dr. Rohit Bhatia, a professor of neurology at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi, and author of one of the studies. "Many questions -- like timing of transplantation, type of cells, mode of transplantation, dosage [and] long-term safety -- need answers before it can be taken from bench to bedside."

The studies are scheduled to be presented Wednesday and Thursday at the American Stroke Association's annual meeting in New Orleans.

Stem cells -- unspecialized cells from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood or human embryos that can change into cells with specific functions -- have been explored as potential therapies for a host of diseases and conditions, including cancer and strokes.

In one of the current studies, 120 moderately affected stroke patients ranging from 18 to 75 years old were split into two groups, with half infused intravenously with stem cells harvested from their hip bones and half serving as controls. About 73 percent of the stem cell group achieved "assisted independence" after six months, compared with 61 percent of the control group, but the difference wasn't considered statistically significant.

In the other study, presented by Bhatia, 40 patients whose stroke occurred between three and 12 months prior were also split into two groups, with half receiving stem cells, which were dissolved in saline and infused over several hours. When compared to controls, stroke patients receiving stem cell therapy showed statistically significant improvements in feeding, dressing and mobility, according to the study. On functional MRI scans, the stem cell recipients also demonstrated an increase in brain activity in regions that control movement planning and motor function.

Neither study yielded adverse effects on patients, which could include tumor development.

But Dr. Matthew Fink, chief of the division of stroke and critical care neurology at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, said that the therapy's safety is the only thing the two studies seemed to demonstrate.

"The thing to keep in mind is that these are really phase one trials," said Fink, also a professor of neurology at Weill Cornell Medical College. "I'm concerned that people get the idea that now stem cell treatment is available for stroke, and that's not the case."

Fink noted that the cells taken from study participants' hip bones can only be characterized as "bone marrow aspirates" since the authors didn't prove that actual stem cells were extracted.

"They haven't really analyzed if they're stem cells and what they turn into when they go into circulation," he added. "The best way to look at this is, it's very preliminary . . . when patients come to me to talk about it, I'm going to tell them it's years away before we know if this is going to work."

Studies presented at scientific conferences should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more information on stem cells.

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics (OTCBB:BCLI) Has Potentially Developed A Treatment For ALS

By LizaAVILA

Newswise — In the quest to find treatments for certain neurological diseases, BrainStorm is fast distinguishing itself as a leader in the field of regenerative medicine using stem cells through its unique platform called NurOwn. The Company can process human mesenchymal stem cells, which are present in bone marrow and are capable of self-renewal as well as differentiation into many other tissues. What makes BrainStorm technology platform very attractive to Big Pharma partnering is the autologous nature of the bone marrow-derived stem cells. This will in turn drastically reduce the expected translation time to market. The value of a treatment for ALS in the U.S. and EU is estimated to be $4Billion. The potential applications for the NurOwn platform to treat disease is fast becoming a reality. In short, BrainStorm is leveraging a patients own cells to heal itself of disease.

BrainStorm updated stakeholders recently with a review of the trial six months post transplantation. The Phase I/II clinical trial for ALS is being conducted at the prestigious Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem by renowned Professor Dimitrios Karussis, M.D., Ph.D. and a distinguished scientific team in its own right from BrainStorm headed by Professor Eldad Melamed. Patients have been transplanted with stem cells derived from their own bone marrow and treated with BrainStorm's NurOwn stem cell technology. The trial will include a total of 24 patients, 12 in an advanced stage of the disease and 12 in an early stage.

The staff at Stem Cell Media and http://www.InvestorStemCell.com has initiated broad investor awareness coverage after Dr. Dimitrios Karussis announced early indications of efficacy last week. Dr. Karussis said, There have been no significant side effects in the initial patients we have treated with BrainStorms NurOwn technology. In addition, even though we are conducting a safety trial, the early clinical follow up of the patients treated with the stem cells shows indications of beneficial clinical effects, such as an improvement in breathing and swallowing ability as well as in muscular power. I am very excited about the safety results, as well as these indications of efficacy, we are seeing. This may represent the biggest hope in this field of degenerative diseases, like ALS.

Sai Rosen, Director of Operations for iCELL, commented, "With all the doom and gloom as of late in the world, we see men and women committed to easing the suffering of millions through regenerative medicine using stem cells. Bravo to BrainStorm tireless efforts to find treatments for unmet medical needs!"

BrainStorms ALS trial is coming to the United States sometime in 2012. After receiving Orphan Drug Designation for its NurOwn cell therapy for ALS in the US, BrainStorm is planning to carry out its Phase II clinical trials in the US. To that end, BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics is currently working with the Northeast ALS consortium to design a phase II trial in the United States and has signed a Memorandum of Understating with the Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Massachusetts Medical School in anticipation of applying for FDA approval to begin ALS human clinical trials in the United States in the course of 2012. The University of Massachusetts Medical School team will be led by Professor Robert H. Brown, MD, DPHIL., and Chair of the Neurological Department at University of Massachusetts Medical School. Professor Brown is a leading expert in neuromuscular genetics and is world renowned for his expertise in ALS. Professor Merit Cudkowitz will lead the Massachusetts General Hospital team.

About BrainStorm (OTC.BB:BCLI) is a leading developer of stem cell technologies to provide treatments for currently incurable neurodegenerative diseases. The Company is focused on developing NTF cells from the patient's own bone marrow in order to treat, Parkinson, ALS, and Spinal Cord Injury

InvestorStemCell.com is dedicated to bringing investors and stakeholders together in thoughtful discussion to educate and publicize the incredible advancements in the regenerative medicine sector.

DO NOT BASE ANY INVESTMENT DECISION UPON ANY MATERIALS FOUND ON THIS REPORT OR WEBSITE. We are not registered as a securities broker-dealer or an investment adviser either with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") or with any state securities regulatory authority. We are neither licensed nor qualified to provide investment advice.

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Jeevan Oration 2011: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: It’s potential

By raymumme

04-01-2012 21:51 Dr. Alok Srivastava, Chairman, National Apex Committee for Stem cell Research

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Stem Cell Therapy – Medistem Labs Panama Laboratory Tour – Video

By raymumme

02-01-2012 12:26 See inside our state-of-the-art adult stem cell facilities in Panama City, Panama.

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"One Match" — Stem Cell

By LizaAVILA

14-12-2011 14:13 Crossroads Intern, Renee Davidson, explored the issue of stem cell/bone marrow donations interviewing a brave little girl, Alysha Dykstra, who knows first-hand what it's like to be in need and end up trying to find her one match. .

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Shelley’s stem cell transplant! – Video

By NEVAGiles23

23-09-2010 09:10 9/22/10 A day to remember!

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Bone marrow / Stem cell transplant – in isolation baby Yasmina tells a story. – Video

By daniellenierenberg

31-03-2011 09:39

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Sickle Cell Half Match Stem Cell Transplant 4 – Video

By raymumme

06-11-2011 01:09 This is day 0 of the half match stem cell bone marrow transplant video 2. During this day I received 13 bags of stem cells. This was the first major event after going through the initial steps to get my body ready to receive donated cells from my brother.

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Stem cells used for medical treatment – Video

By NEVAGiles23

19-11-2011 21:51 Dr. An explains which stem cells he uses: Usually two different types of stem cells are used, bone marrow derived stem cells and umbilical cord derived stem cells.

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Stem cells used for medical treatment - Video

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HIV/AIDS: Advancing Stem Cell Therapies: 2011 CIRM Grantee Meeting – Video

By LizaAVILA

09-11-2011 13:11 Paula Cannon speaks at the 2011CIRM Grantee Meeting about a stem cell-based therapy for HIV/AIDS.

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HIV/AIDS: Advancing Stem Cell Therapies: 2011 CIRM Grantee Meeting - Video

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Radiation Stem Cell Half Match Transplant 1 – Video

By Dr. Matthew Watson

05-11-2011 22:57 This video is 1 of 2 videos on the day I was to receive radiation during the preparation to receive donor stem cells from my brother. This video is poated to help people see some of the steps they may need to do in order to receive a bone marrow transplant

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Radiation Stem Cell Half Match Transplant 1 - Video

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Sickle Cell Stem Cell Half Match Transplant Day -3 – Video

By LizaAVILA

05-11-2011 19:41 This is the second video I shot while going through my stem cell transplant this was the last day of campath which is a form of chemo that is used to help prepare your body to accept the transplanted cells.

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Sickle Cell Stem Cell Half Match Transplant Day -3 - Video

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ALS – Stem Cell therapy (English) – Video

By daniellenierenberg

17-10-2011 14:27 This video, is a testimonial of a patient California that went to Progencell, for a Stem cell treatment for his ALS.

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ALS - Stem Cell therapy (English) - Video

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Adult Stem Cells Help Repair Hearts / Cardiologist explains Bone Marrow Stem Cells – Video

By Dr. Matthew Watson

25-12-2011 12:17 http://www.adult-stemcells-blog.com Zannos Grekos MD,Interventional Cardiologist, tells how your OWN adult stem cells help repair hearts and how adult stem cells released from the bone marrow travel to the heart to Renew and repair cardiac problems. Review all your adult stem cell options to repair and renew your body ,including the world's first patented adult stem cell enhancer capsules.

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Adult Stem Cells Help Repair Hearts / Cardiologist explains Bone Marrow Stem Cells - Video

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Stem Cell Transplantation | Insights

By JoanneRUSSELL25

05-12-2011 15:18 Insights

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Stem Cell Transplantation | Insights

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