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What is being done to treat MS? – Telegraph.co.uk

By Dr. Matthew Watson

Considered untreatable until the early 1990s, multiple sclerosis (MS) has benefited in recent decades from huge progress in developing treatments for people with relapsing MS, the most common form of the condition at the point of diagnosis. But there are many people living with the progressive forms of MS who face increasing disability and still have very few, if any, treatment options.

Thats why the MS Society is now focusing its attention on finding effective treatments for everyone with MS. And it has a clear plan to get there.

To stop MS, people will need to be treated with a combination of drugs, explains the charitys director of research, Dr Susan Kohlhaas. This might include one drug that acts on the immune system, another that prompts brain stem cells to repair damage to myelin, the fatty substance protecting nerve fibres, and a treatment that increases the resilience of brain and nerve cells to help prevent damage occurring in the first place.

Were now at a point where were beginning to understand the molecular mechanisms that cause myelin damage and promote repair exactly what we need to stop MS, she says. Were also in the middle of a promising trial of a common statin, which we think may be able to protect nerves. The Stop MS Appeal is about making sure we have a coordinated approach to developing these treatments and can do it as quickly and efficiently as possible.

In early 2020, the MS Society plans to launch a world-leading clinical trials platform to test multiple treatments for MS at the same time. The aim is to set up a large trial in which several drugs can be tested concurrently on different groups of patients the first time this will ever have been done in neurodegenerative disease.

It will be a much more efficient process than having separate trials and means participants will have a much higher chance of receiving an active treatment that may work, rather than a placebo. Regular reviews will ensure that promising drugs can go straight through to late-stage clinical trials, while ineffective drugs are dropped and replaced by others.

This means desperately needed new treatments could reach people living with progressive MS much faster, says Dr Kohlhaas. We now have around 40 researchers actively working on the programme and theres a real sense of momentum and excitement about its potential.

The MS Society Tissue Bank is a repository of brain and spinal-cord tissue donated by people with MS after their death to help researchers understand more about the condition. The charity has recently invested 1.5million to fund new developments at the facility including a digital brain bank of high-definition pictures of brain tissue that will allow researchers around the world easier access to the resource.

The MS Society also funds research facilities around the UK and the UK MS Register, which enables people to record information about the progress of their condition every six months. An important research tool and source of data, it can also help identify patients for new trials.

Something Im really proud of is that we involve people with MS in the decision-making about research, says Dr Kohlhaas. They sit on our panels and committees to decide what to fund, and they have a strong voice. Im confident this approach has absolutely changed our way of working and ensured we really focus on what people with MS want.

Our vision is that, by 2025, well have treatments in late-stage clinical trials that can be taken through into practice quite quickly, and that well soon have the ability to start treating people with combinations of treatments that not only slow the progress of MS but can actually stop it.

This article is brought to you by the MS Society and Telegraph Spark. The MS Society believes that with investment, MS can be stopped. Scientists can see a future in which no one with the condition need worry about it getting worse. But action is needed now.

Donate today and help the MS Society raise 100million to find treatments for everyone. Visit mssociety.org.uk/stop-ms-now

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Stem Cells Market : Insights Into the Competitive Scenario of the Market – Online News Guru

By Dr. Matthew Watson

In theglobal stem cells marketa sizeable proportion of companies are trying to garner investments from organizations based overseas. This is one of the strategies leveraged by them to grow their market share. Further, they are also forging partnerships with pharmaceutical organizations to up revenues.

In addition, companies in the global stem cells market are pouring money into expansion through multidisciplinary and multi-sector collaboration for large scale production of high quality pluripotent and differentiated cells. The market, at present, is characterized by a diverse product portfolio, which is expected to up competition, and eventually growth in the market.

Some of the key players operating in the global stem cells market are STEMCELL Technologies Inc., Astellas Pharma Inc., Cellular Engineering Technologies Inc., BioTime Inc., Takara Bio Inc., U.S. Stem Cell, Inc., BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc., Cytori Therapeutics, Inc., Osiris Therapeutics, Inc., and Caladrius Biosciences, Inc.

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As per a report by Transparency Market Research, the global market for stem cells is expected to register a healthy CAGR of 13.8% during the period from 2017 to 2025 to become worth US$270.5 bn by 2025.

Depending upon the type of products, the global stem cell market can be divided into adult stem cells, human embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, etc. Of them, the segment of adult stem cells accounts for a leading share in the market. This is because of their ability to generate trillions of specialized cells which may lower the risks of rejection and repair tissue damage.

Depending upon geography, the key segments of the global stem cells market are North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and the Middle East and Africa. At present, North America dominates the market because of the substantial investments in the field, impressive economic growth, rising instances of target chronic diseases, and technological progress. As per the TMR report, the market in North America will likely retain its dominant share in the near future to become worth US$167.33 bn by 2025.

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Investments in Research Drives Market

Constant thrust on research to broaden the utility scope of associated products is at the forefront of driving growth in the global stem cells market. Such research projects have generated various possibilities of different clinical applications of these cells, to usher in new treatments for diseases.Since cellular therapies are considered the next major step in transforming healthcare, companies are expanding their cellular therapy portfolio to include a range of ailments such as Parkinsons disease, type 1 diabetes, spinal cord injury, Alzheimers disease, etc.

The growing prevalence of chronic diseases and increasing investments of pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies in stem cell research are the key driving factors for the stem cells therapeutics market. The growing number of stem cell donors, improved stem cell banking facilities, and increasing research and development are other crucial factors serving to propel the market, explains the lead analyst of the report.

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Caroline Wyatt: The fight to reverse damage caused by MS – BBC News

By Dr. Matthew Watson

Image caption Caroline Wyatt visited Prof Robin Franklin to find out more about a drug that might help stop the progression of MS

"I don't like to think of the future. It's such a big question mark. I just keep living in the present."

Karine Mather was diagnosed with MS when she was 27, although she noticed the first symptoms much earlier.

It started off as a mental-health issue with anxiety and depression, she remembers. Later, she noticed she was starting to limp when she walked longer distances.

Karine began using a walker to help with her balance and stamina, and then a scooter when she could no longer walk very far.

"I got to the stage where the wheelchair became quite liberating, and gave me back a sense of freedom again. Now I rely on the power-chair full-time because I can't stand by myself any more."

Now Karine and her wife, Sarah, have had to give up their full-time jobs.

Karine was forced to stop working as a customer service adviser at a bank because she could no longer fulfil the physical demands of work and Sarah gave up working as a data analyst so she could take care of Karine.

Now 34, Karine retains the use of just one hand, and suffers pain, stiffness and spasticity in her body that has got worse as the disease has progressed.

"It feels like a fist clenching all the time. And I have days when my mind is cloudy and I miss out words and sentences."

Both remain upbeat but the financial, as well as the emotional, impact of MS has been huge.

Karine's MS is the type known as "primary progressive", or PPMS, which meant that for the first years after diagnosis, no disease-modifying treatment was available.

One new drug - Ocrevus, or ocrelizumab - was recently licensed for early PPMS in the UK but came too late to help Karine.

Now the MS Society is launching an ambitious "Stop MS" appeal, aiming to raise 100m to fund research over the next decade into treatments that can stop the progression of disability in MS.

Since being diagnosed with MS in 2015, after many years of symptoms, I've been looking for anything that might help slow or even stop the progression of my MS, which affects the nerves in my brain and spinal cord.

I last wrote about my MS after travelling to Mexico for an autologous stem cell transplant (aHSCT) in 2017.

Sadly, despite initial improvements, I'm now back to where I was before: slowly but surely getting worse.

The only improvements that have endured are the lifting of some of the crushing brain fog I had before HSCT and less hesitation in my speech.

For both, I am eternally grateful, as they mean I can continue to work at the BBC, in the job I love.

However, I have no idea how long this reprieve will last.

The fatigue that had long been my worst symptom is now back with a vengeance, so that staying awake throughout a busy working day remains a challenge.

That MS fatigue did lift for a few months, and it felt miraculous. I awoke every day refreshed. But then it returned, and I awake after eight full hours fast asleep feeling as if I haven't been to bed at all.

The ageing process - including menopause - has almost certainly been a factor in the worsening of some symptoms.

Ageing cells repair less well, and with my faulty immune system apparently determined to keep stripping away the myelin sheath that should protect my nerves, I'm less able now to repair the damage than I was when the disease first began to affect me in around 1992.

Since 2016, I've had to walk using a stick to aid my balance. It is sparkly-topped; an effort to make the accoutrements of disability just a little more cheery.

Dizziness is now a constant companion. It rarely goes away, making car travel or even buses a nightmare. Just turning my head too fast can make me stagger or fall over.

And for the past year or two, my right foot has begun to drag along the ground thanks to foot drop, meaning that I trip more often because I can't fully raise it.

I am always grateful to the strangers who kindly stop to help me up from the uneven pavement when I do fall.

Perhaps most worrying for me is that my right hand no longer works as it used to, catching on the computer keyboard as my outer fingers drag lazily along the keys, sullenly refusing my brain's command to lift.

In the mornings, both my hands and my feet are numb and frozen, then painfully full of pins and needles before warming up enough to be usable a few hours later.

When I wake, I wonder how long it might be until these hands and feet barely function at all, and quickly push that unwelcome thought away.

I'm well aware how very lucky I am that the progression of my MS has been relatively slow - at least until recently. I've learned how better to conserve energy for the things that really matter, though I still chafe at how little I manage to achieve.

Having enough energy to cook a meal from scratch on a day off is a cause for rejoicing. I'm still learning how to save up enough energy for family and friends, and not use up all of my much-depleted ration for work or research.

I have had to face the fact that I have now probably gone from the relapsing-remitting phase of MS (for which a dozen or so treatments exist) into the secondary progressive phase, for which there is currently no treatment licensed in the UK to stop the relentless progression that will affect so many of the 100,000 or more of us living with MS here.

But that may be about to change.

Anna Williams, professor of regenerative neurology at the University of Edinburgh, is looking at how the brain responds to MS damage and how the fatty myelin sheath under attack in MS can be restored more efficiently.

"We have to look at ways to stop the nerves dying," she says. "We want to be able to try to limit that either by keeping the nerves alive, or keeping them working better."

Repurposing existing drugs to help with remyelination should prove the quickest route to therapies for progressive forms of MS, because creating and licensing new ones is a much lengthier and more expensive process.

Prof Williams still sees patients at the Anne Rowling Clinic of Regenerative Neurology in Edinburgh, named in memory of the Harry Potter author J K Rowling's mother, who had MS. (The author this year donated 15m for research at the unit.)

"At the moment, with PPMS or SPMS, we can always give relief for pain or stiffness but we won't change the course of the disease.

"So for those patients, to slow or stop or reverse the disease can only be done with more research, and money is critical for research."

The biggest trial yet in the UK for patients with secondary progressive MS is the MS STAT2 trial, conducted by Prof Jeremy Chataway for the UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology in London.

The trial is still recruiting at 30 centres across the UK to look at whether simvastatin, a drug used to treat high cholesterol, can slow or stop disability progression. If so, it has the potential to become one of the first disease-modifying therapies for people with secondary progressive MS.

And perhaps most encouraging of all, Prof Robin Franklin and his team at the Wellcome-MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute recently published research suggesting a common diabetes drug - metformin - could hold the key to stopping disease progression in MS.

Costing just a few pence per tablet, metformin appears to have an ability to restore cells to a younger, healthier state and encourage myelin regrowth.

The next question is whether it works in people as well as it does in the lab.

Prof Franklin says: "This is a drug that's well tolerated and widely available. There is every reason to believe that the effects that we have seen - which have been so spectacular - will translate into humans.

"This is the great frontier of MS therapy. We're good at stopping the inflammation in MS. What we're not so good at doing is repairing the damage. All this work has given us some real hope that this medicine will reverse the damage done by MS."

I certainly feel rather more hopeful than I did.

I've changed as much about my lifestyle as I can - prioritising sleep, eating healthily, largely giving up alcohol, doing yoga and stretching every day, and cutting back on stress, be that reporting from war zones or attending too many BBC meetings.

But I'm all too aware that time is against me as my ageing brain and body struggle to repair the damage done in their lengthy continuing battle with my own immune system.

My hope now is that these trials will show good enough results in the next few years for at least one or two of the drugs to be rapidly approved for MS so they can help people like Karine and me before it's too late.

I ask Karine what she makes of the current research.

She is suitably succinct.

"I'm sitting here with just the one limb working and I'm thinking - quicker, please."

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BEYOND LOCAL: Expert recommends ‘path of cautious optimism’ about the future of stem cell treatment – ElliotLakeToday.com

By Dr. Matthew Watson

This article, written byKatharine Sedivy-Haley, University of British Columbia, originally appeared on The Conversation and is republished here with permission:

When I was applying to graduate school in 2012, it felt like stem cells were about to revolutionize medicine.

Stem cells have the ability to renew themselves, and mature into specialized cells like heart or brain cells. This allows them to multiply and repair damage.

If stem cell genes are edited to fix defects causing diseases like anemia or immune deficiency, healthy cells can theoretically be reintroduced into a patient, thereby eliminating or preventing a disease. If these stem cells are taken or made from the patient themselves, they are a perfect genetic match for that individual, which means their body will not reject the tissue transplant.

Because of this potential, I was excited that my PhD project at the University of British Columbia gave me the opportunity to work with stem cells.

However, stem cell hype has led some to pay thousands of dollars on advertised stem cell treatments that promise to cure ailments from arthritis to Parkinsons disease. These treatments often dont help and may harm patients.

Despite the potential for stem cells to improve medicine, there are many challenges as they move from lab to clinic. In general, stem cell treatment requires we have a good understanding of stem cell types and how they mature. We also need stem cell culturing methods that will reliably produce large quantities of pure cells. And we need to figure out the correct cell dose and deliver it to the right part of the body.

Embryonic, 'induced and pluripotent

Stem cells come in multiple types. Embryonic stem cells come from embryos which makes them controversial to obtain.

A newly discovered stem cell type is the induced pluripotent stem cell. These cells are created by collecting adult cells, such as skin cells, and reprogramming them by inserting control genes which activate or induce a state similar to embryonic stem cells. This embryo-like state of having the versatile potential to turn into any adult cell type, is called being pluripotent.

However, induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells can form tumours. Induced pluripotent stem cells carry a particularly high risk of harmful mutation and cancer because of their genetic instability and changes introduced during reprogramming.

Genetic damage could be avoided by using younger tissues such as umbilical cord blood, avoiding tissues that might contain pre-existing mutations (like sun-damaged skin cells), and using better methods for reprogramming.

Stem cells used to test drugs

For now, safety concerns mean pluripotent cells have barely made it to the clinic, but they have been used to test drugs.

For drug research, it is valuable yet often difficult to get research samples with specific disease-causing mutations; for example, brain cells from people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Researchers can, however, take a skin cell sample from a patient, create an induced pluripotent stem-cell line with their mutation and then make neurons out of those stem cells. This provides a renewable source of cells affected by the disease.

This approach could also be used for personalized medicine, testing how a particular patient will respond to different drugs for conditions like heart disease.

Vision loss from fat stem cells

Stem cells can also be found in adults. While embryonic stem cells can turn into any cell in the body, aside from rare newly discovered exceptions, adult stem cells mostly turn into a subset of mature adult cells.

For example, hematopoietic stem cells in blood and bone marrow can turn into any blood cell and are widely used in treating certain cancers and blood disorders.

A major challenge with adult stem cells is getting the right kind of stem cell in useful quantities. This is particularly difficult with eye and nerve cells. Most research is done with accessible stem cell types, like stem cells from fat.

Fat stem cells are also used in stem cell clinics without proper oversight or safety testing. Three patients experienced severe vision loss after having these cells injected into their eyes. There is little evidence that fat stem cells can turn into retinal cells.

Clinical complications

Currently, stem cell based treatments are still mostly experimental, and while some results are encouraging, several clinical trials have failed.

In the brain, despite progress in developing treatment for genetic disorders and spinal cord injury, treatments for stroke have been unsuccessful. Results might depend on method of stem cell delivery, timing of treatment and age and health of the patient. Frustratingly, older and sicker tissues may be more resistant to treatment.

For eye conditions, a treatment using adult stem cells to treat corneal injuries has recently been approved. A treatment for macular degeneration using cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells is in progress, though it had to be redesigned due to concerns about cancer-causing mutations.

A path of cautious optimism

While scientists have good reason to be interested in stem cells, miracle cures are not right around the corner. There are many questions about how to implement treatments to provide benefit safely.

In some cases, advertised stem cell treatments may not actually use stem cells. Recent research suggests mesenchymal stem cells, which are commonly isolated from fat, are really a mixture of cells. These cells have regenerative properties, but may or may not include actual stem cells. Calling something a stem cell treatment is great marketing, but without regulation patients dont know what theyre getting.

Members of the public (and grad students) are advised to moderate their excitement in favour of cautious optimism.

Katharine Sedivy-Haley, PhD Candidate in Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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Artificial meat is now made in space, coming to a supermarket near you – FRANCE 24

By Dr. Matthew Watson

New York (AFP)

Creating meat from cells is no longer the realm of science fiction: a Russian cosmonaut did it aboard the International Space Station, and it is just a matter of time before these products arrive in supermarkets.

Tests carried out in space in September led to the production of beef, rabbit and fish tissue using a 3D printer.

This new technology "could make long-term travel possible and renew space exploration," to Mars for example, said Didier Toubia, the head of the Israeli startup Aleph Farms, which provided cells for the tests.

"But our goal is to sell meat on Earth," he told AFP.

The idea "is not to replace traditional agriculture," he said. "It's about being a better alternative to factory farming."

- What's in a name? -

The first burger designed with cow stem cells was made by Mark Post, a Dutch scientist from Maastricht University, and presented in 2013. Several startups have since taken to the niche market.

The cost of production is still very high, and none of the products are available for sale.

The name for the meat products is still up for debate: laboratory, artificial, cell-based, cultivated.

But tastings have already taken place, and industry players are banking on small-scale commercialization taking place fairly quickly.

"It is likely to be this year," Josh Tetrick, the head of California's JUST company, which is growing meat from cells, said at a conference in San Francisco.

"Not on the market in four thousand Walmarts or in all McDonald's, but in a handful of restaurants," Tetrick said.

"The question is what do you want to put out at what cost," said Niya Gupta, founder and CEO of Fork & Goode, which is growing meat from cells in New York.

"As an industry, we are finally making progress on the science. The next step is really making progress on the engineering challenges."

The arrival of laboratory-grown meat on supermarket shelves at reasonable prices could happen in five to 20 years, according to estimates.

But it would need more investment, according to several observers. The sector attracted a total of only $73 million in 2018, according to The Good Food Institute, an organization promoting alternatives to meat and fish.

Another obstacle is regulation, which remains imprecise.

In the United States, for example, the government outlined a regulatory framework that shared oversight of cell-based foods between the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration, but it is not yet finalized.

- Labeling -

For supporters, cell-based meat and fish products can transform the production system sustainably by avoiding the raising and killing of animals.

However, questions remain about the real environmental impact, particularly in terms of energy consumption, as well as about safety.

But "the market opportunity is enormous, especially for seafood," said Lou Cooperhouse, the CEO of startup BlueNalu.

"Global demand in the world is at an all-time high," he said of seafood, but "we have a supply problem" with overfishing, climate change and a very variable supply, coupled with "an issue with the supply itself" with, for example, the presence of mercury in some fish.

"What if we could add a third leg on the supply chain, wild caught, farm raised, cell-based?"

Created in 2018, BlueNalu is developing a technological platform that can be used to design various seafood products, mainly fish filets without bones or skin.

Scientific literature on stem cells, biological engineering or organic tissue printing already existed, said BlueNalu's chief technology officer Chris Dammann.

"We need to put the technology back together and optimize it," Dammann said.

The rise of cell-based proteins is not a major source of concern for traditional agriculture.

"It is something we need to monitor," said Scott Bennett, the director of congressional relations for the Farm Bureau organization, which represents farmers and ranchers.

Bennett said he feels "our energy would be much better spent in focusing (on) increasing the overall market shares for proteins, especially in developing countries."

"Some people for social reasons will want to buy this product. But there will always remain a market for conventional meat," he said.

"We feel as it should not be called meat, because we don't want to confuse the consumer as to what this really is. We want to make sure the labelling is very clear," Bennett added.

2019 AFP

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Threatening regulatory policies for the birth giver of stem-cell technology – Medical Herald

By Dr. Matthew Watson

The only country that has stood out in creating companies to offer stem-cell therapies has been Japan, while the other countries across the globe have been struggling to achieve the same. It has been five years since Japan has been legally allowed to extract stem cells from different skin biopsies, using them in the injections for chronic and complex diseases such as heart diseases. More than 3,700 treatments have received green light as a result of the regulatory laws being passed. However, a majority of the treatments and therapies have not passed the randomised, controlled, double blind clinical trial a global standard to prove its safety and effectiveness. Not having passed the trial proves its unreliability on the outcome of the treatment altogether.

Although, in fast need of getting therapies and products commercialised, many entrepreneurs and scientists across the world are looking to enter Japan for a more rapid route of getting their business started. Therefore, looking at the rush that various companies are in, in order to commercialise their products, the government is looking to introduce a stringent policy framework for better regulatory changes. This also forces other countries to keep an eye on the regulations to ensure ethical work is being conducted.

The law requires high quality processed stem-cells in certified cell-processing centres and treatments that need to be passed through an independent ethical-review board. While the double-blind clinical trials are expensive in Japan, as claimed by Japans Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, there are many ethical issues that are involved by giving placebos to people who are suffering from illnesses. This is the reason behind the need for stringent ethical laws that do not hamper the lives of people in any way and risking their health.

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Elle Macpherson Shares Her Health And Beauty Secrets | BEAUTY/crew – BEAUTYcrew

By Dr. Matthew Watson

Of all the beauty brains we want to pick, Elle Macphersons tops the list. We want to know it ALL. The makeup she uses, her skin care routine, what she eats in the morning, how to make our hair look THAT good, her secret to defying time the whole shebang. So, when the WelleCo founder sat down with us to chat beauty and wellness, youre going to bet we asked her everything.

Get ready to take some notes - heres what a supermodels beauty routine looks like.

On her morning ritual

I am usually up with the sun and like to wake and practice some breathing and mediation. Its a routine that helps balance me from the start of the day. (I aim to not touch my phone).

I then have hot water and lemon.

My son Cy is up at 6am and while hes getting ready for school, I prepare his breakfast and I make myself aSUPER ELIXIR Greens. I find itessentialfor wellness from within. It helps my sense of vitality, strengthens the immune system, supports the digestive system andgivesmy skina healthyglow, plus it seems to curb any sugar cravings, so my moods are more stable, and my diet is more balanced.

Once Cy is off to school, Iexercise, either in my home gym or outside in the fresh morning air, then I have my breakfast.I like to keep it simple - fruit or raw oatmeal or chia seed pudding, before jumping into the shower and getting ready for the day.On the weekends Ill have a bulletproof coffeewith coconut oil and grass-fed butter. Making sure the brain has enough fats is essential for me.

I am obsessed with dry brushing and exfoliating. I useWelleCos Japanese Green Tea Salt Scruband its the first thing I do when showering. If Im feeling courageous, Ill take hot and cold showers to encourage circulation, and usinga great body cream, likeBeautycountersBody Butter in Citrus Mimosa.

After breakfast, I head to my office, usually with 32oz of homemade green vegetable juice including kale, cucumber, turmeric, garlic, lemon, ginger, live sprouts, and Romaine lettuce.I rotate the base of the juice every day between cucumber, celery, spinach and squash. It means I geta variety of nutrients and less chance of my body forming allergies.

On her skin care routine

Beauty-wise,Ilove usingDefenAgeSkincare, which I was introduced to while I was at 11 HotelsJust Agelessspa in New York City. Their products are formulatedusingAge-Repair Defensins, which are peptides that work with our master stem cells to help combat the visible signs of ageing. I love their1-Step Multi-Cleanse, an exfoliator that containsfruit enzymes (including papaya) that are gentler on the skin than acids - but just as effective.

Whilst in Australia this time,I discoveredRationaleat All Saints Clinic.For daywearI love usingtheir B3-T Tinted Superfluid SPF50,whichprovides greatprotectionandgives my skin abeautifulhealthy radiance. In the evening, I usetheDNA Night Creamfor its potent complex of vitamin A,withUniverskinP Serum,which has a bespoke compound ofingredientsdesigned to brighten and hydrate skin, as well as improvethe appearance of pigmentation.

On her go-to makeup brands

I tend to gravitate towards makeup thats subtle and good for my skin. I am enjoying theOxygenetixline that is created and used bydoctors. TheirBreathable Second Skinfoundation is beautiful to wear and great for sensitive skin. I also like theTintSkin Hydrating FoundationbyBeautycounteras it is super hydrating.Gucci Westmans new lineWestman Atelieris fantastic,too.HerVital Skin FoundationSticksare easy to use and look beautifully natural. They are formulated with plant-based actives andfeel supernatural and glowing to wear. I always have my four favourites on standby:foundation,highlighter,blushandcontour. Their packaging is amazing.

On what drives her to launch new products for WelleCo

Through my personal wellness journey, I have discovered that nothing has an impact on my wellbeing like how I nourish my body,which ishowWelleCoreally all began six years ago.We wanted tosharewith the worldthe unique combination of plant-based and Chinese herb supplements I had been taking and experiencing incredible results with.

As an Australian-based company, WelleCo believes in empowering people to positively influence their health. We call it Wellness the Australian way. All of the ingredients were chosen for their ability to work well, as team players, creating a synergistic, amplified effect when combined.

Our constant motivatoris ourloyal, progressive and curious globalcommunity. It isalwaysWelleCos aimto accompanyeach customeron theirwellness journey.No matter what their stage of life, we wantto provide the most premium solutions that areeasy for people to incorporateinto their daily regimes.

Eachof ourproductstargetspecific personalrequirements and providesolutions that benefit all stages of wellbeing, be it our range of plant-based elixirs, our organic vegetable wash orgreen tea salt body scrub.

Our most recent launch, the WelleCo SUPER BOOSTER range,isformulated with botanical extracts and nutrients for targeted support where you need it be it immune system health, liver support or stronger hair, skin and nails. Importantly, it is designed to beeasyto use and an integral step of a simple daily wellness routine. Along with The SUPER ELIXIR and NOURISHING PROTEIN range for men, women and children, our elixirsare formulated toprovidebenefits for the whole family.All you need to do is add water.

I now know, understanding the value of a plant-based diet to feed the mitochondria of the cells isvital andwe wondered if people would value the importance ofgreens andplant-basedproteins.Luckily,our customerstell us theyexperience the same beauty, health and wellness benefitsthat I do,and we are soprivilegedthey choose toincludeWelleCo intheirdailywellnessregimes.

It is this positive feedback,andthe foundation on which we built WelleCo, thatdrivesus to continue toconstantlyinnovateto ensureweareevolvingand supporting our customersindividualwellness journeys.

On her favourite WelleCo products

The SUPER ELIXIR Greens.Its our essential daily greens anda cleanfoundation for cellular and systemic support.Each of ourelixirs are an imperative part of a simple and effective three-step daily wellness routine. The first step is The SUPER ELIXIR. I have two teaspoons every morning with filtered water without fail, and I am loving our new Ginger and Lemon flavour at the moment!

AfterTheSUPER ELIXIR, I recommend our NOURISHING PROTEIN, which isa clean, complete, powdered plant protein designed by nutritional doctors for nourishing and maintaining a lean and strong body. It is the perfect mid-morning or afternoon nourishing snack. I am obsessed with thechocolate;it tastes naughty without any of the bad stuff.

My third stepis our SLEEP WELLE Calming Tea. I have always had quite a lot oftrouble sleeping, so thistea hasnow become my nightly ritual.It is blended with natural herbs including valerian, hops and skullcap to calm the mind and help the body rest, rejuvenate and recover.Be prepared for a very deep and restorative sleep! Its truly amazing.

On her all-time favourite beauty indulgence

I am more a wellness girl to be honest. For me its not about beautifying, but more about wellness, being toned and moisturisedwith soft skin.

I was lucky to experience the most amazing wellness experience this year at Kamalaya, Koh Samui. It is a stunning Wellness Sanctuary and Holistic Spa where you can completely reset the mind and body in a beautiful and calming environment. I love their personalised approach and the focus on restorative and healing treatments, body movement and nutrition. The treatments and philosophy, food and environment were some of the best I have ever experienced. It was a wonderful combination between eastern and western treatments and I although I was there for a week, I could easily have stayed three! I was never bored and felt better as the days went on.

My biggest weekly indulgence is Sheila Perez coming to my house to do the Sheila Perez Method lymphatic drainage and sculpting. I would have her two to three times a week if I could, but for now we have a standing once a week appointment.

I lovemyTherasageThera360Portable Infrared Saunatoo.It assists the detox process, strengthens the immune system and encourages circulation and glowing skin.

On the beauty essentials she packs when travelling overseas

I love myRimowacabin bag. It fits a weeks worth of essentials,which is perfect becauseI love not packing too much stuff its so liberating.

Most importantly for travel is doubling up on my SUPER ELIXIR Greens. I always travel with Immune System Support with Kakadu Plum SUPER BOOSTERS, which I have on their own with water, or combined with my SUPER ELIXIR. Formulated with vitamin C from Kakadu plum and acerola cherry as well as medicinal herbs, they provide immune defence for fighting inflammation and supporting immune system health.

Our NOURISHING PROTEIN is always a must when I am on the road, as often I cant find quality quick and easy food and snacks. NOURISHING PROTEIN is formulated using a combination of organic pea and organic brown rice proteins, as well as herbal extracts, vitamins, minerals and pre and probiotics. It is fantastic for helping energy levels and I find it really fills me up. Its easy to take too, which of course is essential when you are travelling. Just add water, shake and sip.

I stick to my usual skin care routine. I love David de Rothschilds Lost Explorer skin careproducts. It is a super-efficient range and packaged in a travel size so it fits in my suitcase perfectly. And for something more robust the Rationale collection of serums and face creams are the right size for traveling, plus extra efficient and truly work.

My beauty style is always very natural. I dont like to wear a lot of makeup, so my beauty routine is very pared-back and simple. My favourite beauty look is one that starts with a dewy, healthy complexion. I dont tend to wear foundation, but if I need a little coverage, I apply (with my fingers) a touch of Westman AtelierVital Skin Foundation, but only where I need it. For a touch of colour, I smooth onRMS Rose Lip2CheekandPat McGrath Skin Fetishcheek shine for just the right amount of definition.They all come in travel-friendly packaging and are super easy to stow in my bag.

On the kind of beauty and wellness products we would find in her suitcase

For me, beauty comes from the inside out -so first things first -SUPER ELIXIR Greens. Our ultimate ingestible beauty formula is just the right blendof premiumplant-based nutrients that work together to address acidity in the body and nourish right down to cellular level, which really helps the body recover from thestressof travel andI really find helpsreduce jet lag.Ineverfly without mySUPER ELIXIR travel sachetstucked safely in my makeup bag for quick pick-me-ups. I have a SUPER ELIXIRbefore I board, whilst Im in the air, and another as Im landing.

I always pack a NOURISHING PROTEIN TravelSet. I have one daily, blended with water. It helpsensure Ieat as cleanly as possibleandassistswith energy levels and adjusting to a new time zone.It also ensures I always have a healthy snack on hand when options are limited.

I also try to remember to wear broad-spectrum SPF sunscreen every day, especially when out on the reflective ocean sun. Rationale make a great one and I love Dr Barbara Sturm products, particularly her Sun Drops and serums as well as sunblock.

Oh,and Ialways have a tube of LucasPapaw Ointmentstashed away to puton my lips and cuticles. Its very moisturising and very Aussie!

On her favourite career highlight

WelleCo is the combination of wanting to create a business and wanting to enable inner and outer beauty for everyone. I think its fair to say that we all aspire to having a successful business and to make money. But I believe there is also a sort of Holy Grail of business which consists of doing what you love with purpose, making a difference, and making a profit doing it. Its very fulfilling. Andso,this is what we are seeking to achieve with WelleCo creating quality products that are simple to integrate into peoples lives, and that helpthembalancetheir inner and outer beauty. The most exciting thing iswe are reallyonly just getting started!

Being a co-founder, director and shareholder of WelleCo has been very fulfilling but the most joy comes from supporting our team in making the highest quality sustainable plant-based products that help people in their daily life.

On whats next

We have so many exciting things on the horizon for WelleCo,andIm so grateful for where I am, and what Im doing in my life. It is a privilege to be in a position to be able to impact and share with people some of the things Ive learned. And the major one has been the understanding that our bodies areincredible,and they can heal and thrive if given the right environment.

Want more celebrity beauty secrets? Check out the beauty products Phoebe Burgess cant live without, and Shelley Crafts biggest skin sin.

Main image credit: @ellemacpherson

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Global 3D Bioprinting Market Outlook, 2019-2024 – Market Anticipated to Reach $1.64 Billion by 2024 – ResearchAndMarkets.com – Business Wire

By Dr. Matthew Watson

DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The "3D Bioprinting Market by Component (3D Bioprinters (Microextrusion, Inkjet, Laser), Bioink (Natural, Synthetic, Hybrid)), Material (Hydrogel, Living Cells), Application (Skin, Drug Research), End user (Biopharma, Academia) - Global Forecast to 2024" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

The 3D bioprinting market is projected to reach USD 1,647 million by 2024 from USD 651 million in 2019, at a CAGR of 20.4% from 2019 to 2024.

The growth in this market is mainly driven by technological advancements in 3D bioprinters and biomaterials, increasing the use of 3D bioprinting in the pharmaceutical and cosmetology industries, and rising public and private funding to support bioprinting research activities. On the other hand, a shortage of skilled professionals and high development and production costs are hampering the growth of this market.

The major players in the market include Organovo Holdings Inc. (US), CELLINK (Sweden), Allevi Inc. (US), Aspect Biosystems Ltd. (Canada), EnvisionTEC GmbH (Germany), Cyfuse Biomedical K.K. (Japan), Poietis (France), TeVido BioDevices (US), Nano3D Biosciences, Inc. (US), ROKIT Healthcare (South Korea), Digilab Inc. (US), regenHU (Switzerland), GeSiM (Germany), Advanced Solutions Life Sciences (US), and Regenovo Biotechnology Co., Ltd. (China) among others.

Microextrusion technology commanded the largest share of 3D bioprinters segment owing to technological advancements

The component segment of the 3D bioprinting market is segmented into 3D bioprinters and bioinks. The 3D bioprinters market is further sub-segmented on the basis of technology into magnetic 3D bioprinting, laser-assisted bioprinting, inkjet 3D bioprinting, microextrusion bioprinting, and other technologies; whereas bioinks segment is further sub-segmented into natural, synthetic, and hybrid bioinks. The microextrusion bioprinting technology has commanded the largest share of the market in 2019 due to technological advancements in the segment and the increasing research activities.

The drug discovery research application segment accounted for the largest share of the 3D bioprinting market in 2019

In terms of applications, the 3D bioprinting market is segmented into research applications and clinical applications. The demand for research applications is further sub-segmented into drug research, regenerative medicine, and 3D cell culture. Among these, the drug research segment accounted for the largest share of the market in 2019, owing to the growing adoption of 3D bioprinting technology by biopharmaceutical companies. While, in terms of clinical applications, the market is segmented into skin, bone & cartilage, blood vessels, and other clinical applications.

Based on material, living cells segment commanded the leading market share in 2019

Based on material, the 3D bioprinting market is broadly segmented into hydrogels, extracellular matrices, living cells, and other biomaterials. Increasing R&D activities for the use of living cells in 3D bioprinting is driving the growth of the living cells segment. Living cells have the ability to fabricate patient-specific tissues in a defined manner. With advances in 3D bioprinting, scientists and researchers are making use of living cells as a biomaterial in 3D bioprinting. These cells can be used to print living tissues as well as organ structures for surgical implantations. However, ethical issues associated with the use of stem cells in 3D bioprinting might hamper the growth of the segment.

The US 3D bioprinting market to hold prominent market share over the forecast period

On the basis of region, the 3D bioprinting market is segmented into North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Rest of the World (Latin America, and the Middle East and Africa). The US held a significant share of the global 3D bioprinting market in 2019. Factors such as new product launches and technological advancements in 3D bioprinting technology and the presence of key players in the region are driving the growth of the 3D bioprinting market in the US. Moreover, extensive research activities and funding for 3D bioprinting will further fuel the market growth in the US.

Market Dynamics

Drivers

Restraints

Opportunities

Challenges

Companies Mentioned

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/y3b5p7

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Skincare: Five natural remedies to get rid of keloids overnight – Republic World – Republic World

By Dr. Matthew Watson

Want to get rid of a keloid? Here we are with easyand simple keloid removal home remedies that you must try. Keloid is a type of raised scar which appears where the skin had an injury. Skin burn, cut or severe acne cause a scar and some of keloids continue to grow for years.

Baking soda helps to shed the damaged and dead cells. Prepare a mixture of baking soda and diluted hydrogen peroxide. Apply the paste on the keloid affected area with the help of cotton balls and leave it for 30 minutes. Later, wash it off with water and apply any night cream moisturizer. For best results, repeat this process 2-3 times a day for a fewweeks.

ALSO READ:Hair Care: Here Are Four Essential And Simple Grooming Tips For Men

Aspirin, usually used for headache, is also used to get rid of keloids. Due to its anti-inflammatory properties, aspirin is beneficial in the treatment of keloids. Crush 3-4 aspirin tablets and add water to prepare a smooth and thick paste. Apply the paste on a scar and wait until it gets dry. Rinse off by water and apply some olive oil or tea tree oil. Use this method once a day or every alternate day.

Extract the juice from the lemon and apply on the affected area. Leave it for about 30 minutes and later wash it with warm water. For better results follow this process every day. Because of its antioxidant property, lemon helps in quick healing of keloids.

ALSO READ:Google Ban Ads For 'unproven' Medical Treatments, Including Stem Cells

Prepare a paste of sandalwood in rosewater and apply it on the affected area before bedtime. Let it rest for the whole night and rinse off with warm water the next morning. Sandalwood, which is rich in regenerating property when mixed with rosewater, gives the best result to get rid of keloids. Repeat this process every night for one week and observe changes by yourself.

Honey, one of the best-used substances, in several skin treatments, helps in getting rid of keloids. Directly apply fresh honey on scars. Massage lightly and leave it for 30-40 minutes. Rinse it off with water and use this method for some weeks to get rid of keloids.

The above-mentioned home remedies give the best results when followed religiously. As we know keloids are difficult to treat, and hence doctors suggest to take steps soon after injury or piercing. So, whenever you notice scars, follow these steps to get rid of them.

ALSO READ:Nandita Das On Discrimination: 'Wear Your Skin Colour With Confidence'

ALSO READ:Millie Bobby Brown Slammed By Internet For Faking Skin Care Tutorial

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Do you have ‘diet face’? It’s everywhere | Times2 – The Times

By Dr. Matthew Watson

Jenni Murray is spot on staying slim can take its toll on your features, says Christa DSouza

I do love Jenni Murray. For telling it like it is. For those of you not aware of the comments she made at the Henley literary festival, let me recap for you. She recalled the advice given to her by Barbara Cartland Jenni, you know, when you get older you sacrifice your face or your figure. Dont sacrifice your face, just sit down a lot. Murray went on to explain how, despite having gone through a gastrectomy to lose weight, she had, at the age of 69, decided to follow Babss advice because she didnt want to end up looking like Nigel Lawson. And thats no insult to Nigel Lawson, she went on to say in her mellifluous, unbitchy way, but you know, when he

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BrainStorm Announces Notice of US Patent Allowance for NurOwn Cellular Therapeutic Technology Platform – Yahoo Finance

By Dr. Matthew Watson

NEW YORK, Oct. 07, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc.(NASDAQ: BCLI), a leading developer of adult stem cell therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases, today announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has issued a Notice of Allowance for BrainStorm's new US Patent Application, number: 15/113,105, titled: Method of Qualifying Cells'.

The allowed claims cover a pharmaceutical composition for MSC-NTF cells secreting neurotrophic factors (NurOwn) comprising a culture medium as a carrier and an isolated population of differentiated bone marrow-derived MSCs that secrete neurotrophic factors.

Patent families protecting NurOwn have previously issued in the United States, Japan, Europe, Hong-Kong and Israel.

"This allowance further expands the patent protection of the NurOwn Cellular Therapeutic Technology Platform and enables us to accelerate clinical development for new neurodegenerative indications, commented BrainStorm President and CEO,Chaim Lebovits.

About NurOwn

NurOwn (autologous MSC-NTF) cells represent a promising investigational therapeutic approach to targeting disease pathways important in neurodegenerative disorders. MSC-NTF cells are produced from autologous, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that have been expanded and differentiated ex vivo. MSCs are converted into MSC-NTF cells by growing them under patented conditions that induce the cells to secrete high levels of neurotrophic factors. Autologous MSC-NTF cells can effectively deliver multiple NTFs and immunomodulatory cytokines directly to the site of damage to elicit a desired biological effect and ultimately slow or stabilize disease progression. BrainStorm is currently conducting a Phase 3 pivotal trial of autologous MSC-NTF cells for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). BrainStorm also recently received U.S. FDA acceptance to initiate a Phase 2 open-label multicenter trial in progressive MS and enrollment began in March 2019.

About BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc.

BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc. is a leading developer of innovative autologous adult stem cell therapeutics for debilitating neurodegenerative diseases. The Company holds the rights to clinical development and commercialization of the NurOwn technology platform used to produce autologous MSC-NTF cells through an exclusive, worldwide licensing agreement. Autologous MSC-NTF cells have received Orphan Drug status designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in ALS. BrainStorm is currently enrolling a Phase 3 pivotal trial in ALS (NCT03280056), investigating repeat-administration of autologous MSC-NTF cells at six sites in the U.S., supported by a grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM CLIN2-0989). The pivotal study is intended to support a filing for U.S. FDA approval of autologous MSC-NTF cells in ALS. BrainStorm also recently received U.S. FDA clearance to initiate a Phase 2 open-label multicenter trial in progressive Multiple Sclerosis. The Phase 2 study of autologous MSC-NTF cells in patients with progressive MS (NCT03799718) started enrollment in March 2019. For more information, visit the company's website at http://www.brainstorm-cell.com

Safe-Harbor Statements

Statements in this announcement other than historical data and information constitute "forward-looking statements" and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc.'s actual results to differ materially from those stated or implied by such forward-looking statements. Terms and phrases such as "may", "should", "would", "could", "will", "expect", "likely", "believe", "plan", "estimate", "predict", "potential", and similar terms and phrases are intended to identify these forward-looking statements. The potential risks and uncertainties include, without limitation, risks associated with BrainStorm's limited operating history, history of losses; minimal working capital, dependence on its license to Ramot's technology; ability to adequately protect the technology; dependence on key executives and on its scientific consultants; ability to obtain required regulatory approvals; and other factors detailed in BrainStorm's annual report on Form 10-K and quarterly reports on Form 10-Q available at http://www.sec.gov. These factors should be considered carefully, and readers should not place undue reliance on BrainStorm's forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release are based on the beliefs, expectations and opinions of management as of the date of this press release. We do not assume any obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect actual results or assumptions if circumstances or management's beliefs, expectations or opinions should change, unless otherwise required by law. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements.

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New Viral Vector for Sickle Cell Gene Therapy Likely to Be More Effective, NIH Study Says – Sickle Cell Anemia News

By Dr. Matthew Watson

A newly designed viral vector the vehicle that delivers a gene therapyto a patients cells for use insickle cell anemia is more efficient than earlier vectors at introducing healthy copies of genes into stem cells and can be produced in greater amounts, studies in animal models show.

The study Development of a forward-orientated therapeutic lentiviral vector for hemoglobin disorders was published in the journal Nature Communications.

Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells that binds oxygen, allowing oxygen to be transported around the body. Mutations in the HBBgene, which encodes a component of hemoglobin, causessickle cell.

Gene therapies involve either altering the mutated gene or introducing a healthy version of that gene to the body. Still under development for sickle cell, an estimated 27 patients have undergone experimental gene therapy. One strategy involves removing hematopoietic stem cells (which function to produce blood cells) from a patients bone marrow. A healthy copy of the HBB gene is then introduced into the cells using a modified, harmless virus known as a viral vector. The cells are then transplanted back into the patient where they will produce healthy red blood cells.

Traditionally, viral vectors for sickle cell have been designed in a way known as reverse structural orientation. This means that the HBB gene is translated or read from right to left, like reading an English sentence backwards. The reverse structural orientation design ensures that a key section of the gene (known as intron 2), which is necessary for the production of high levels of the HBB gene, is retained during viral vector preparation.

However, this design makes preparing the viral vectors more difficult, and decreases the efficiency of introducing the gene into the stem cells.

Researchersat the National Institutes of Healthdesigned a new viral vector, one in which the HBB gene is forward orientated and read from left to right. Genes essential for the virus were inserted into intron 2, meaning that only vectors that retained intron 2 would be produced (a type of positive selection).

Our new vector is an important breakthrough in the field of gene therapy for sickle cell disease, John Tisdale, MD, chief of the Cellular and Molecular Therapeutic Branch at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the studys senior author, said in a press release.

Its the new kid on the block and represents a substantial improvement in our ability to produce high capacity, high efficiency vectors for treating this devastating disorder, he added.

The researchers compared the new vectors to traditional reverse-orientated vectors in mouse and monkey models. The new vectors were four to 10 times more efficient at introducing the healthy HBBgene into the stem cells, and could carry up to six times more HBB genes compared to the conventional vectors.

Furthermore, the new vectors remained incorporated into the cells of monkeys up to four years after a transplant. These vectors could also be produced in greater amounts, which may lessen the time and costs required for large-scale vector production.

The researchers hope that these characteristics will make gene therapy for sickle cell disease more effective and increase its use. The new vector design still needs to be tested in clinical trials in patients.

Our lab has been working on improving beta-globin vectors for almost a decade and finally decided to try something radically different and it worked, Tisdale said.

These findings bring us closer to a curative gene therapy approach for hemoglobin disorders, he added.

Patricia holds her Ph.D. in Cell Biology from University Nova de Lisboa, and has served as an author on several research projects and fellowships, as well as major grant applications for European Agencies. She also served as a PhD student research assistant in the Laboratory of Doctor David A. Fidock, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Columbia University, New York.

Total Posts: 94

Margarida graduated with a BS in Health Sciences from the University of Lisbon and a MSc in Biotechnology from Instituto Superior Tcnico (IST-UL). She worked as a molecular biologist research associate at a Cambridge UK-based biotech company that discovers and develops therapeutic, fully human monoclonal antibodies.

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Novartis completes certification of initial sites in Quebec for first approved Canadian CAR-T therapy, Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel)(i) – Canada NewsWire

By Dr. Matthew Watson

DORVAL, QC, Oct. 9, 2019 /CNW/ - Novartis Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc. is pleased to announce that sites in Quebec have been certified in accordance with applicable requirements to treat eligible patients with Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel), the first chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy that received regulatory approval in Canada. Patients with relapsed/refractory (r/r) pediatric and young adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and adult r/r diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) may be eligible to be treated with Kymriah at one of the initially certified Canadian treatment sites. This news coincides with the Quebec government announcement that Kymriah is now reimbursed for eligible patients under the Rgie de l'assurance maladie du Qubec (RAMQ)ii.

Eligible patients in Quebec are now able to access Kymriah from the Centre hospitalier universitaire (CHU) Sainte-Justine and Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital (HMR) in Montreal.

"Novartis feels it is important to acknowledge the collaborative effort by all stakeholders involved to ensure Canadians have access to the first approved CAR-T therapy for patients with B-cell ALL and DLBCL who historically have poor outcomes. With treatment centers certified in Quebec, this allows patients with these two life-threatening cancers the opportunity to be treated with CAR-T therapy," said Daniel Hbert, Medical Director, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc. "Novartis is committed to bringing additional qualified treatment centers from other parts of the country into the network to give Canadians the opportunity to be treated closer to home."

Due to the sophisticated and individualized nature of Kymriah, treatment sites that are part of the network are required to be FACT-accredited (Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy), qualified to perform intravenous infusion of stem cells collected from the bone marrow of a donor, also referred to as allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) and have experience with cell therapies, leukemia and lymphoma to facilitate safe and seamless delivery of Kymriah to eligible patients.

"We are thrilled with this news because we will now be able to treat patients at our institution with the knowledge that their therapy will be publicly funded. We see this as a significant step forward. The young patients we see who have refractory or relapsed B-cell ALL are desperately in need of a new treatment option. Kymriah brings hope to patients who are literally in a fight for their life." said Dr. Henrique Bittencourt, hematologist at the CHU Sainte-Justine in Montreal and Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Universit de Montral.

"The expertise at HMR has raised the profile of our organization, which is a major Quebec, Canadian and worldwide pole for health innovation. Thanks to the dedicated work of our care, research and teaching teams, patients can now access this new treatment with demonstrated effectiveness and impact on quality of life," said Sylvain Lemieux, President and CEO, Centre intgr universitaire de sant et de services sociaux (CIUSSS) de l'Est-de-l'le-de-Montral.

About Kymriah Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel), a CD19-directed genetically modified autologous T-cell immunocellular therapy, is approved to treat two life-threatening cancers that have limited treatment options and historically poor outcomes, demonstrating the critical need for new therapies for these patients.

Kymriah is approved by Health Canada for use in pediatric and young adult patients 3 to 25 years of age with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who are refractory, have relapsed after allogenic stem cell transplant (SCT) or are otherwise ineligible for SCT, or have experienced second or later relapse; and for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory (r/r) large B-cell lymphoma after two or more lines of systemic therapy including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) not otherwise specified, high grade B-cell lymphoma and DLBCL arising from follicular lymphomai.

Kymriah is a one-time treatment that uses a patient's own T cells to fight and kill cancer cells. Bringing this innovative therapy to Canadian patients requires collaboration among many health system stakeholders.

Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel) Important Safety InformationThe full prescribing information for Kymriah can be found at: http://www.novartis.ca

Novartis Leadership in Cell and Gene TherapyNovartis is at the forefront of investigational immunocellular therapy and was the first pharmaceutical company to significantly invest in CAR-T research, work with pioneers in CAR-T and initiate global CAR-T trials. Kymriah, the first approved CAR-T cell therapy in Canada, is the cornerstone of this strategy. Active research programs are underway targeting other hematologic malignancies and solid tumors, and include efforts focused on next generation CAR-Ts that involve simplified manufacturing schemes and gene edited cells.

About Novartis in CanadaNovartis Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc., a leader in the healthcare field, is committed to the discovery, development and marketing of innovative products to improve the well-being of all Canadians. In 2018, the company invested $52 million in research and development in Canada. Located in Dorval, Quebec, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc. employs approximately 1,000 people in Canada and is an affiliate of Novartis AG, which provides innovative healthcare solutions that address the evolving needs of patients and societies. For further information, please consult http://www.novartis.ca.

About NovartisNovartis is reimagining medicine to improve and extend people's lives. As a leading global medicines company, we use innovative science and digital technologies to create transformative treatments in areas of great medical need. In our quest to find new medicines, we consistently rank among the world's top companies investing in research and development. Novartis products reach more than 750 million people globally and we are finding innovative ways to expand access to our latest treatments. About 108,000 people of more than 140 nationalities work at Novartis around the world. Find out more at http://www.novartis.com.

Kymriah is a registered trademark.

References_____________________________________________i Novartis Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc., Kymriah Product Monograph. January 7, 2019.ii Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services press release. October 8, 2019. Available at: https://www.newswire.ca/fr/news-releases/la-therapie-car-t-cell-maintenant-disponible-au-quebec-821953237.html

SOURCE Novartis Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc.

For further information: Novartis Media Relations, Daphne Weatherby, Novartis Corporate Communications, +1 514 633 7873, E-mail: camlph.communications@novartis.com

http://www.novartis.ca

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Novartis completes certification of initial sites in Quebec for first approved Canadian CAR-T therapy, Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel)(i) - Canada NewsWire

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World Cord Blood Day 2019 to Welcome Leading Transplant Doctors and Pioneering Cellular Therapy Researchers – Yahoo Finance

By Dr. Matthew Watson

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Penny Lancaster is reduced to tears as she gives bone marrow donor Ronnie Musselwhite, 5, The Suns Young H – The Scottish Sun

By Dr. Matthew Watson

PENNY Lancaster was reduced to tears as she handed five-year-old Ronnie Musselwhite the Young Hero gong at The Suns Who Cares Wins health awards last night.

Spurs fan Ronnie bravely offered to give his older sister Ebonie a bone marrow transplant last year.

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Eight-year-old Ebonie had leukaemia and it was her only hope.

Mum Christine Jenkins, 40, said: Ronnies stem cells worked perfectly. They did what they were supposed to do but the leukaemia came back somewhere new.

Ebonie, of Crawley, West Sussex, nominated her younger brother before her death in June.

Rod Stewarts partner Penny chatted with Ronnie about his love of football and Spurs.

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She said: To say I am humbled to be here is an understatement. Sometimes you think life has turned a corner on you, but then someone else turns up to give you some inspiration.

"The courage this little man has shown is absolutely incredible. Hes only five years old, hes lost a sister.

"He was incredibly shy to stand up in front of everyone to collect his award, but he again was so brave.

Christine said: We want Ronnie to know that what he did still worked, was still brave, even though he lost his sister.

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PM Boris Johnson was also at the awards held at The Suns London HQ near The Shard and paid tribute to our NHS heroes.

He presented an award to a pair of quick-thinking hospital porters who saved the life of a seven-week-old baby boy.

Nick Evans, 48, and Ruth Lowe, 47, sprang into action after Logan Clifford stopped breathing.

His parents, Sarah and Mike were visiting a relative at the Princess Royal Hospital in Telford, Shrops, when they noticed Logans lips had turned blue.

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Sarahs screams alerted Ruth, who shouted for Nick. He grabbed Logan and performed CPR as he ran half a mile down the corridor to A&E.

Nick continued CPR until the resuscitation team took over and the porters stayed by Logans parents side until they knew he was going to be OK. Sarah, 30, has called the two porters my heroes.

As he handed the pair the Ultimate Lifesaver trophy, the PM said: The NHS is revered around the world, and in no small part due to the heroes working in it every day.

He added: My experience of the NHS is like everybody else in the NHS - one of admiration and love.

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"It is the most extraordinary institution in the world. If our country was an omelette then the NHS is the egg white that holds the great British cake together.

Virgin Radio DJ Chris Evans presented the Best Nurse gong to Liz Monaghan, 53. She set up the widely praised Purple Rose initiative, which aims to improve the care for patients and their loved ones in the last days of their life.

Liz, who works at the Florence Nightingale Hospice, based at the Stoke Mandeville Hospital in Aylesbury, Bucks, said: Im a little embarrassed to have won. Im a small part of a big team.

DJ Chris said: Youve got to prepare yourself for nights like this because otherwise they hit you like an express train.

Who Cares Wins Awards: The winners

BEST HEALTH CHARITY

Winner: Matt Hampson Foundation

Former English rugby union player Matt Hampson set up a charity to help others after being left paralysed in a scrum in 2005.

Other nominees: Superhero Foundation and Team Domenica

BEST NEONATAL SPECIALIST

Winner: Professor Kypros Nicolaides

Professor Nicolaides performed pioneering keyhole surgeon on Sherrie Sharps unborn son Jaxon. By extraordinary coincidence, as a young surgeon, he also operated on Sherries mother when she was in the womb.

Other nominees: Dr Vesna Pavasovic and Professor Massimo Caputo

UNSUNG HERO

Winner: Therapeutic Care Volunteers at South Tees NHS Foundation Trust

30 therapeutic care volunteers, who all have a learning or physical disability, give up their time to support patients with spinal injuries at The James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough. They include Ify Nwokoro.

Other nominees: Ben Slack and Rob Allen

GROUNDBREAKING PIONEER

Winner: Guys and St Thomas London Auditory Brainstem Implant (ABI) Service

Leia Armitage, eight, was born with a rare form of deafness and was never expected to speak. But she now can thanks to pioneering brain surgery and speech therapy carried out by Guys and St Thomas London Auditory Brainstem Implant (ABI) Service.

Other nominees: Dr Helen Spencer and Girish Vajramani

BEST DOCTOR

Winner: Dr Matthew Boulter

Dr Boulter served in Afghanistan, teaches wild trauma to army medics and his surgery became the first in Cornwall to be given veteran friendly accreditation.

Other nominees: Margaret France and Dr Bijay Sinha

BEST MIDWIFE

Winner: Jane Parke

Jane helped deliver the youngest surviving twin boys in Britain when they were born at 22 weeks last year. She flew 190 miles with their mum Jennie Powell to a specialist neonatal unit.

Other nominees: Charlotte Day and Nagmeh Teymourian

ULTIMATE LIFESAVER

Winner: Ruth Lowe and Nick Evans

Porters Ruth and Nick saved the life of Sarah and Mike Cliffords seven-week-old baby Logan. He stopped breathing as they walked through the main entrance of The Princess Royal Hospital in Telford to visit a sick relative.

Other nominees: Dr Mark Forrest and Mike Merrett

BEST NURSE

Winner: Liz Monaghan

Liz is the Matron of the Florence Nightingale Hospice in Aylesbury, Bucks, and came up with the idea for the widely praised Purple Rose initiative to improve the care for patients in the last days of their lives.

Other nominees: Margaret Ballard and Carlton DeCosta

MENTAL HEALTH HERO

Winner: Ben West

Ben lost his brother Sam, 15, to suicide last year and since his death, has campaigned tirelessly to raise awareness for mental health.

Other nominees: Beth Gregan and Catherine Benfield

YOUNG HERO

Winner: Ronnie Musselwhite

Ronnie offered to help his sister Ebonie by giving her a bone marrow transplant when she was diagnosed with a rare form of leukaemia. Ebonie nominated her brother for his bravery before she died in June.

Other nominees: Bella Field and Kaitlyn Wright

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I only walked ten metres into the room tonight and I already nearly burst into tears three times.

TV star Christine Lampard gave the Best Neonatal Specialist award to Prof Kypros Nicolaides, 66.

He was nominated by Sherrie Sharp, 29, of Horsham, West Sussex, for saving the life of her unborn baby son and her own.

After scans revealed Jaxson had spina bifida, Sherrie was offered a termination. But she contacted Prof Nicolaides, a surgeon at Kings College Hospital, London.

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He had saved her life 30 years earlier when she developed a rare blood disorder in her mums womb.

He agreed to perform ground-breaking surgery on Jaxson while he was in Sherries womb.

Prof Nicolaides said: I was delighted to be able to help. Sherrie said: He has saved so many generations of my family. Hes our guardian angel.

The Who Cares Wins Awards were set up in 2017 by The Sun to honour the nations heroic doctors, nurses, midwives, other NHS staff and volunteers.

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The Duchess of York presented an award to the parents of Natasha Ednan-Laperouse, 15, who died of an allergic reaction to a sandwich from Pret.

The duchess said: Can I just say to The Sun, I think youre incredible. Every minute Im sitting there and thinking Im so lucky. The NHS, The Sun and all of you, this is what makes Britain so great.

Lorraine Kelly, who presented the awards, said: Earlier on this year my dad was very sick and we honestly thought we were going to lose him.

"It was really difficult and it was only because of the efforts of the NHS hes still here. Its fantastic.

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Who Cares Wins Awards: The winners

BEST HEALTH CHARITY

Nominees: Superhero Foundation

Team Domenica

Winner: Matt Hampson Foundation

Former English rugby union player Matt Hampson set up a charity to help others after being left paralysed in a scrum in 2005.

BEST NEONATAL SPECIALIST

Nominees: Dr Vesna Pavasovic

Professor Massimo Caputo

Winner: Professor Kypros Nicolaides

Professor Nicolaides performed pioneering keyhole surgeon on Sherrie Sharps unborn son Jaxon. By extraordinary coincidence, as a young surgeon, he also operated on Sherries mother when she was in the womb.

UNSUNG HERO

Nominees: Ben Slack

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BEYOND LOCAL: Expert recommends ‘path of cautious optimism’ about the future of stem cell treatment – ThoroldNews.com

By Dr. Matthew Watson

This article, written byKatharine Sedivy-Haley, University of British Columbia, originally appeared on The Conversation and is republished here with permission:

When I was applying to graduate school in 2012, it felt like stem cells were about to revolutionize medicine.

Stem cells have the ability to renew themselves, and mature into specialized cells like heart or brain cells. This allows them to multiply and repair damage.

If stem cell genes are edited to fix defects causing diseases like anemia or immune deficiency, healthy cells can theoretically be reintroduced into a patient, thereby eliminating or preventing a disease. If these stem cells are taken or made from the patient themselves, they are a perfect genetic match for that individual, which means their body will not reject the tissue transplant.

Because of this potential, I was excited that my PhD project at the University of British Columbia gave me the opportunity to work with stem cells.

However, stem cell hype has led some to pay thousands of dollars on advertised stem cell treatments that promise to cure ailments from arthritis to Parkinsons disease. These treatments often dont help and may harm patients.

Despite the potential for stem cells to improve medicine, there are many challenges as they move from lab to clinic. In general, stem cell treatment requires we have a good understanding of stem cell types and how they mature. We also need stem cell culturing methods that will reliably produce large quantities of pure cells. And we need to figure out the correct cell dose and deliver it to the right part of the body.

Embryonic, 'induced and pluripotent

Stem cells come in multiple types. Embryonic stem cells come from embryos which makes them controversial to obtain.

A newly discovered stem cell type is the induced pluripotent stem cell. These cells are created by collecting adult cells, such as skin cells, and reprogramming them by inserting control genes which activate or induce a state similar to embryonic stem cells. This embryo-like state of having the versatile potential to turn into any adult cell type, is called being pluripotent.

However, induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells can form tumours. Induced pluripotent stem cells carry a particularly high risk of harmful mutation and cancer because of their genetic instability and changes introduced during reprogramming.

Genetic damage could be avoided by using younger tissues such as umbilical cord blood, avoiding tissues that might contain pre-existing mutations (like sun-damaged skin cells), and using better methods for reprogramming.

Stem cells used to test drugs

For now, safety concerns mean pluripotent cells have barely made it to the clinic, but they have been used to test drugs.

For drug research, it is valuable yet often difficult to get research samples with specific disease-causing mutations; for example, brain cells from people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Researchers can, however, take a skin cell sample from a patient, create an induced pluripotent stem-cell line with their mutation and then make neurons out of those stem cells. This provides a renewable source of cells affected by the disease.

This approach could also be used for personalized medicine, testing how a particular patient will respond to different drugs for conditions like heart disease.

Vision loss from fat stem cells

Stem cells can also be found in adults. While embryonic stem cells can turn into any cell in the body, aside from rare newly discovered exceptions, adult stem cells mostly turn into a subset of mature adult cells.

For example, hematopoietic stem cells in blood and bone marrow can turn into any blood cell and are widely used in treating certain cancers and blood disorders.

A major challenge with adult stem cells is getting the right kind of stem cell in useful quantities. This is particularly difficult with eye and nerve cells. Most research is done with accessible stem cell types, like stem cells from fat.

Fat stem cells are also used in stem cell clinics without proper oversight or safety testing. Three patients experienced severe vision loss after having these cells injected into their eyes. There is little evidence that fat stem cells can turn into retinal cells.

Clinical complications

Currently, stem cell based treatments are still mostly experimental, and while some results are encouraging, several clinical trials have failed.

In the brain, despite progress in developing treatment for genetic disorders and spinal cord injury, treatments for stroke have been unsuccessful. Results might depend on method of stem cell delivery, timing of treatment and age and health of the patient. Frustratingly, older and sicker tissues may be more resistant to treatment.

For eye conditions, a treatment using adult stem cells to treat corneal injuries has recently been approved. A treatment for macular degeneration using cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells is in progress, though it had to be redesigned due to concerns about cancer-causing mutations.

A path of cautious optimism

While scientists have good reason to be interested in stem cells, miracle cures are not right around the corner. There are many questions about how to implement treatments to provide benefit safely.

In some cases, advertised stem cell treatments may not actually use stem cells. Recent research suggests mesenchymal stem cells, which are commonly isolated from fat, are really a mixture of cells. These cells have regenerative properties, but may or may not include actual stem cells. Calling something a stem cell treatment is great marketing, but without regulation patients dont know what theyre getting.

Members of the public (and grad students) are advised to moderate their excitement in favour of cautious optimism.

Katharine Sedivy-Haley, PhD Candidate in Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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After 5 Years Of Trials, Doctors Create Human Liver From Scratch – CBS Pittsburgh

By Dr. Matthew Watson

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) In a dish sits a human liver.

Not removed from a person, but created from scratch.

Its not like wahoo and the next morning you think, ah, Im gonna make a human liver,' says Dr. Alejandro Soto-Gutirrez of the Pittsburgh Liver Research Center.

It took five years of trial and error but using stem cells, genetic and tissue engineering, organ cultures and a team of experts in these areas, the researchers have come up with this.

Alexandra Collin de Lhortet, Ph.D. of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine explains the process.

A rat liver gets stripped of its cells so that only the connective tissue remains.

From a small piece of human skin, the scientists pluck out stem cells and coax them into becoming human liver cells and the cells are collected.

Then theyre injected into the chamber, called a bioreactor, where they take up residence in the empty rat liver.

The entire process from gathering the cells to make a liver, to get to this point, where you have an actual mini human liver in a bioreactor, takes several months.

It will stay alive, or viable, for only a few days.

But in that short time, the researchers can try different medicines to treat the diseased liver.

You could test any sort of therapeutic by simply injecting this chemical through the system, says Dr. Collin.

In the past, animal livers played a role in this kind of research but human livers didnt always respond in the same way.

With this system, the cells have had genetic modification to recreate diseases, for example, fatty liver, a growing problem in the United States.

This technology has the potential for personalized medicine. From your skin cells, they could grow your own mini liver to figure out which medicines would work for you.

I believe its a very good biological tool to screen treatments that are not otherwise being tested in humans themselves because its dangerous, says Dr. Soto.

As its designed, it would be a long stretch to create livers for transplantation.

If you mean how far we are to make actual livers for people, I think we are very far away. Were probably many years away. But this is a good step, Dr. Soto says.

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Lab-grown meat made on International Space Station for the first time – CBBC Newsround

By Dr. Matthew Watson

Lab-grown meat has been successfully made in space for the first time.

Cells of a cow were taken to space where they were grown into small-scale muscle tissue using a 3D bioprinter.

Israeli food technology company, Aleph Farms grew the meat on the Russian segment of the International Space Station, 248 miles away from any natural resources.

The technique could be used in the future to provide meat for people living on the space station.

Aleph Farms said that the aim of the experiment was to advance its research into meat production and prove meat can be produced without natural resources.

"In space, we don't have 10,000 or 15,000 Litres of water available to produce one Kg (2.205 Pound) of beef," Aleph Farms said.

What is lab-grown meat?

This is the world's first lab-grown beef burger in 2013 made in a Petri dish

Lab-grown meat is meat made in a laboratory without killing animals.

Animals are made up of stem cells, which form special tissue like nerve or skin cells.

Scientists worked out how to take cells from an animal - like a cow- and multiply them in a special container called a Petri dish.

Eventually from one tiny muscle cell, tens of billions of cells can be grown. These join together to form muscle tissue.

Lots of strands of muscle tissue together can form 'meat'.

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The scientist who grows tiny brains in her laboratory – The Times

By Dr. Matthew Watson

Dr Madeline Lancaster has discovered how to turn stem cells into grey matter. It could lead to treatments for autism and spinal injury

My teenage daughter asks me where Im heading. I tell her Im off to Cambridge to interview a neuroscientist who grows mini-brains in her lab. Wow, my daughter replies. That is so cool.

I recount this to Dr Madeline Lancaster, the scientist in question. She beams and says she thinks its very cool too. In her labs at the Medical Research Councils state-of-the-art Laboratory of Molecular Biology building she cant conceal her enthusiasm as she shows me the mini-brains small curd-like blobs floating in dishes of pinkish fluid. She says wow a lot.

It is these brain organoids (as in organ-like, rather than organism-like) made of living cells that have made Lancaster, 37, a big name in science since she discovered how to create

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Make-up mistakes that make you look older – and item that should go in the bin – Mirror Online

By Dr. Matthew Watson

Many of us rely on makeup as the secret to eternal youth. From covering up dark circles with concealer to adding a flush of colour with a rosy blush it's the perfect little pick-me-up.

But, of course, it's never that simple.

And if you're using the wrong products or the wrong techniques, you may not end up quite as fresh faced as you had hoped.

From using too much powder foundation to forgetting to use SPF, many of our go-to habits could actually be making us look older.

We speak to skin expert Paul Banwell to find out exactly what we should and shouldn't be doing.

To keep your skin hydrated, Paul says you can use simple methods to keep looking youthful.

He says: You can use a high intensity moisturiser, or use indigestible products like a liquid collagen drink - I recommend Skinade, the leading collagen drink which is carefully formulated, a mixture of vitamins and minerals which results in optimal skin health.

Wearing oil based products can clog pores and cause breakouts.

Paul says: The effects of clogged pores can be aided with medical facials like the photogenic facial from TBC Skin atelier, or microdermabrasion, followed by Dermalux LED treatments.

Alternatively, I'd recommend a hydroxyacid boost for pH equilibrium and chemical exfoliation - Rationale's Catalyst Range is best.

However, you can also make a difference by making small changes at home.

Paul says: Similarly, overusing fragranced and alcohol based products may dry out the skin, and in turn cause premature lines and wrinkles.

Try to use oil free products, and aim to use hydrating foundations and creams.

Pollution can be responsible for skin dryness, dullness, clogged pores and skin ageing.

Paul says: Some tips for shielding your skin from pollution are wearing sunscreen, using a good moisturiser to create a barrier between your skin and pollutants and double cleansing your skin - use a product like the Rationale Catalyst cleanser.

Sun exposure, both UV and infrared, can result in sunburn which also causes ageing issues for the skin as the years pass.

They're often credited with giving us a matte, flawless finish but powder foundations can be one of the worst culprits when it comes to ageing. Paul says: Avoid powders, as they tend to set into the fine lines of wrinkles which can make your skin look flaky.

For immune protection, and a product which can be used during a Sunday night ritual to make your skin look fresh and luminous for the week ahead which means you won't need to wear foundation, use the immunologist mask - to be performed weekly (the pot lasts 6 months).

It hydrates and reduces inflammation in problem/ sensitive skin.

While concealers are great for hiding flaws and imperfections, they can also draw attention to any unwanted lines and wrinkles.

Paul says: Concealers might be covering the dark circles, but they also accentuating fine lines, so make sure to only apply concealer to the inner half of your under eye.

Prepping the skin before wearing makeup is also key to a youthful glow. Paul says: Skin around the eyes is thinner that the rest of your face and shows age faster!

Eye creams and products that contain Retin A, a form of vitamin A, are most effective and promote the stimulation of collagen and elastin to tighten the skin.

Suncream shouldn't just be reserved for your annual holiday or trips to the beach. Rather, it should be part of your daily skincare regime.

Paul explains: UV exposure causes 90% of skin damage. Even people who already have signs of premature skin ageing can benefit from making lifestyle changes.

We should all be protecting our skin by using SPF 30 or higher which gives your skin a chance to repair some of the damage.

Fine lines and wrinkles absolutely have a part to play here too, and the best way to eradicate these is through protecting the skin against phototoxic damage and minimising loss of skin integrity.

Collagen peptides in a drink like Skinade will increase collagen turnover and are proven to minimise fine lines.

At the Banwell clinic, we offer Ultimate Sunscreen protection with Rationale B3-T, which will ensure skin is not affected as strongly when in sunlight.

After a long day, it can be tempting to just roll into bed without a second thought for your skin. But you may end up paying the price as a result.

Paul says: Sleeping in your makeup can result in the breakdown of healthy collagen which leads to premature skin ageing. Make sure to take your makeup off thoroughly, and Id recommend a Plasma Shower facial to boost cleansing of the skin, using stem cell technology.

Plasma showers alone help improve texture and quality of skin but can be boosted by various mesotherapy treatments including stem cells, hyaluronic acid and vitamins.

Essentially it encourages hydration, which is essential for optimum physiological functioning of the skin and to optimise all biological processes and immune protection.

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